The Faces That Shaped 2001; Heroes and Villains from the Year the World Declared War against Terrorism and Scottish Politics Was Rocked by Scandal

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), December 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Faces That Shaped 2001; Heroes and Villains from the Year the World Declared War against Terrorism and Scottish Politics Was Rocked by Scandal


THE events of September 11 cast a giant shadow over 2001. The images of jets crashing into the World Trade Center before the giant twin towers collapsed, killing 3000 innocents, transfixed the entire planet.

In the aftermath, the faces of George Bush and Osama bin Laden became permanent fixtures in newspapers and on TV screens - one struggling to digest the enormity of the outrage, the other gloating as he admitted responsibility.

But there were many others who made a significant impact in the past year. Here is our selection of the people who helped shape 2001:

OSAMA BIN LADEN

PUBLIC Enemy Number One, wanted by the USA - dead or alive. The 44-year-old terror chief has a pounds 20million bounty on his head. Sporting a greying beard and dressed in army fatigues, he released flickering home videos with messages for the West and his followers.

In the most sickening, the softly-spoken Saudi exile smirked while talking about the September 11 attacks.

He grinned: "The brothers were overjoyed when the first plane hit the building."

With his Taliban backers routed in Afghanistan and his al-Qaeda network in tatters, time is running out for Osama, who may even be dead already.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE new US president looked like a startled rabbit caught in a car's headlights on September 11, when he spent most of the day on board Air Force One and told America he would hunt down the "folks" responsible.

But he quickly regained his poise and used diplomacy to build and lead a coalition against terrorism.

Bush, 55, and his war cabinet persisted in a bombing campaign in Afghanistan and brought the Taliban to its knees within two months.

TONY BLAIR

THE Prime Minister established himself as America's closest ally and embarked on several shuttle-diplomacy missions across Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Months earlier, he had led Labour to a resounding victory in one of the most predictable - and boring - General Election campaigns in decades. But the Afghan conflict turned Blair into a true world statesman.

At a shortened Labour conference, he promised richer nations could no longer ignore the plight of the poor.

The 48-year-old is hugely popular in the United States for standing shoulder-to-shoulder with their president.

DONALD RUMSFELD

TOUGH-TALKING US Secretary of Defence has ditched political correctness in his War On Terrorism press conferences, admitting he does not care if Osama bin Laden is captured dead or alive.

The 69-year-old former navy pilot has been a rock in the Bush administration, consistently hitting back at criticism of the Afghan bombing campaign. He has played a hawk to US Secretary of State Colin Powell's dove.

RUDOLPH GIULIANI

AMID the smoking ruins of the World Trade Center, a legend was born. Mayor Giuliani, 55, rallied his city with his repeated visits to the disaster site and his show of defiance and humanity amid the appalling carnage.

New Yorkers now regard him as the Big Apple's Winston Churchill. His bravery and compassion earned him a knighthood from the Queen.

Before stepping down from the post at the end of his term of office, he refused a $10m donation from a Saudi prince who had criticised US policy in the Middle East.

HENRY McLEISH

QUOTE of the year belongs to Scotland's outgoing First Minister, Henry McLeish, who claimed his failure to declare to Westminster that he had been sub-letting his Glenrothes office was a "muddle, not a fiddle".

With the affair taking a toll on his private life, McLeish, 53, shocked the nation with his resignation.

His short reign as First Minister had been marred by verbal gaffes and political misjudgment. He was even caught on tape calling Northern Ireland Secretary John Reid a "patronising bastard".

JACK McCONNELL

SCOTLAND'S new First Minister quickly showed why he has been nicknamed Jack The Lad. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Faces That Shaped 2001; Heroes and Villains from the Year the World Declared War against Terrorism and Scottish Politics Was Rocked by Scandal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.