The New Age of Fitness; Rachael Tinniswood Discovers the Trendy Ways of Keeping Your Mind and Body in Good Shape

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), January 8, 2002 | Go to article overview

The New Age of Fitness; Rachael Tinniswood Discovers the Trendy Ways of Keeping Your Mind and Body in Good Shape


IT seems a strange way of dealing with a bad back but pilates fan Belinda Thompson swears by this exercise.

Because, since she started, her pain has decreased and she feels much better all round.

Pioneered by super-fit celebs such as Geri Halliwell, Uma Thurman and Madonna, pilates along with meditation and yoga are seen as the trendy exercises everyone can indulge in.

Dr Lindsey Dugdill, senior lecturer in health at John Moore's University, says: "The stretching aspects of any sort of yoga-based exercise are beneficial, but the psychological benefits are good as well.

"From a health perspective, these type of exercises do have benefits because of the deep breathing involved. By breathing deeply, it slows the breathing and therefore the heart rate, reducing blood pressure."

We take a look at the New Age classes on offer in Merseyside - and those who claim to have benefited from them.

Pilates It might seem like a relatively new phenomenon, but pilates has actually been around since the 1920s, when a soldier called Joseph Pilates devised a form of exercise to attach springs to soliders' sick beds in World War I so that they could still exercise even from their beds.

And for Belinda Thompson, 33, a rehab officer for visually impaired children, pilates has helped ease a painful back problem.

"I have had chronic back pain for the past 10 years, but since I started pilates 18 months ago the pain has been significantly reduced.

"I was in pain every day when my back was bad but now, because I do pilates four times a week, I feel much better. The exercise has also improved my posture and my abdominal muscles are much better.

"It also tones up your legs and arms because you are doing slow movements and so working on those muscles as well."

Yoga Probably the most popular of all the 'New Age' exercises, yoga has gone from strength to strength.

Aimed at improving stamina, flexability, co-ordination and strength, yoga claims to reach muscles other exercises can't reach - and you don't need to look any further than Geri Halliwell for proof.

Chris McNamee, a mum-ofthree in her 40s from Heswall, says: "I have done yoga on and off for eight years now and I have found it to be a great form of exercise and relaxation.

"I had heard about it so I just decided to go and have a go. I have noticed a lot of benefits - it improves your posture because you are very much aware of how you stand.

"People think it is an easier form of exercise but it can be just as hard as an aerobics class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The New Age of Fitness; Rachael Tinniswood Discovers the Trendy Ways of Keeping Your Mind and Body in Good Shape
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.