Peace Activist Brings Aid as Bombs Fall: Organizations Deliver Food, Blankets to Displaced Persons in Afghanistan. (World)

By McClory, Robert | National Catholic Reporter, December 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

Peace Activist Brings Aid as Bombs Fall: Organizations Deliver Food, Blankets to Displaced Persons in Afghanistan. (World)


McClory, Robert, National Catholic Reporter


Feeling the earth shake from the concussion of exploding bombs only four miles away, Douglas Hostetter could think only of "the exquisite irony."

Overhead were B-52 bombers, "exemplars of the postmodern world with their satellite-aided, global-positioning systems and their laser-directed bombs," Hostetter said. And below in this displaced persons camp in northeast Afghanistan were people he described as "inhabitants of a pre-industrial world, without electricity or sewage or decent shelter, where the major form of transportation is the donkey. Here we have the most powerful nation in the world versus the poorest nation in Asia."

The irony was intensified when his coworker at the camp, Suraya Sadeen, pointed to the sky and said, "For the cost of two of those B-52s, I could feed, clothe and educate the whole population of Afghanistan for a year." (Sadeen may have exaggerated. According to a U.S. Air Force fact sheet, a B-52 bomber costs $74 million; the population of Afghanistan before bombing caused an exodus of refugees and reportedly more than 3,000 deaths was about 26 million.)

When Hostetter and Sadeen entered Afghanistan in early November with 239 tons of food and blankets, they provided the first U.S. humanitarian aid to arrive by land since the September terrorist attack in New York. Their achievement was basically a two-person project.

Shortly after the attack, Hostetter, 57, former director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former director of the American Friends Service Committee New England office, decided the peace and pacifist tradition needed to respond immediately. "I realized the poor people of Afghanistan would soon be paying a price for the terrorist activity, though they had nothing to do with it," he said. "So I felt we had to reach out to the victims."

He explained his idea of immediate massive aid to leaders of the Fellowship and the American Friends and together they made commitments of $40,000 for the project.

But he was told the borders into Afghanistan were sealed and no one could get in. He discovered, however, that a former contact, Sadeen, director of Help the Afghan Children, Inc., was also planning an aid mission and knew how to cross the border from Tajikistan. They both did further fundraising and pooled the total, which eventually came to $130,000. They then flew to Tajikistan, purchased enough food and supplies to fill 29 10-ton rented trucks, crossed over a mountainous area and passed through four Russian-manned checkpoints before entering Afghanistan.

"I think we were on real roads most of the way," said Hostetter, "but it was not obvious. We had to trust the driver."

Their target in Afghanistan was the open-air, displaced persons area in the Takhar Province. Here some 10,000 Afghans were spread out over a 10-mile-wide area only a few miles from where the Northern Alliance, aided by U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Peace Activist Brings Aid as Bombs Fall: Organizations Deliver Food, Blankets to Displaced Persons in Afghanistan. (World)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.