Insurers Survey New Mothers about PPD. (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Used)

By Frieden, Joyce | Clinical Psychiatry News, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Insurers Survey New Mothers about PPD. (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Used)


Frieden, Joyce, Clinical Psychiatry News


Experts disagree on whether a postpartum depression screening program started by several health insurers is a good way to reach patients who may be suffering from the condition.

Approximately 20 health plans, under a subcontract with mental health carve-out Magellan Behavioral Health in Columbia, Md., are sending out written questionnaires to new mothers in their plans. The mothers fill out the questionnaires and return them, and case managers at the plan score their answers. The case managers call any patients who screen positive for postpartum depression (PPD) to talk to them and see if they need further treatment from a social worker or psychiatrist.

Dr. Andrew Rudo, Magellan's senior vice president for medical services, said that the screening is a valuable service because PPD occurs in 10%-12% of new mothers. "So many people are unaware of it that it goes undetected and undertreated, and a lot of undue suffering could come from that."

Programs like this one "are an excellent idea because a lot of people don't know about PPD, and patients are unfamiliar with the symptoms," said Dr. Ruta Nonacs of the perinatal psychiatry program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Dr. Nonacs and her colleagues used a similar survey on 850 patients at her hospital's obstetrics clinic and found that approximately 10% suffered from depression after delivery. "The questionnaire helps focus on this problem and draws attention to it."

But Dr. Carol Bernstein of New York University, New York, said that the questionnaire could give some patients a false sense of security. "People's gut reaction is that if they don't check [all the boxes off], they're safe," she said. "And to think a social worker who is not a physician is going to add up the points and make a diagnosis is simply ridiculous. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Insurers Survey New Mothers about PPD. (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Used)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.