Sea Change in South China Sea. (Marine Science)

By Tibbetts, John | Environmental Health Perspectives, October 2001 | Go to article overview

Sea Change in South China Sea. (Marine Science)


Tibbetts, John, Environmental Health Perspectives


The South China Sea is one of the most biologically diverse marine ecosystems in the world. That's why the seven Asian nations that border it--Cambodia, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, and the Philippines--agreed last year to a United Nations Environment Programme/Global Environment Facility (UNEP/GEF) project to reverse environmental degradation trends in the region. Pending final approval, the project would provide $32 million to improve environmental health in the South China Sea region. Half the $32 million is coming from the GEF, and the other half from participating countries and donors.

Rapid economic development and population growth have created significant ecological damage in coastal and marine areas of the seven South China Sea nations. "You've heard of the `East Asian Miracle,' says Alfred Duda, senior advisor on international water issues for the GEF Secretariat. "A part of the East Asian Miracle is rapid development without the environmental aspects being accounted for, and the result is downstream degradation of water and other resources."

At least 270 million people now live along the coastlines of the seven nations, and the coastal population is expected to double over the next 30 years. The primary environmental threats in the South China Sea include mangrove destruction, sewage pollution, exploitive fishing practices, coral reef degradation, and damage to sea grasses and wetlands.

Almost 70% of the region's mangrove forests have disappeared in the past 50 years due to destructive shrimp farming practices, overlogging, and increased development and tourism, says Hugh Kirkman, coordinator of marine and coastal matters for the East Asian Seas Regional Coordinating Unit, the secretariat of the Coordinating Body of the Seas of East Asia. Large-scale disappearance of coastal mangrove forests has led to sediment erosion, water pollution, and a critical loss of nursery habitat for young fish.

Moreover, an estimated 60% of coral reefs in Southeast Asia have been severely degraded or destroyed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sea Change in South China Sea. (Marine Science)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.