A Loving Way for Middle-Aged Men to Remain Healthy; Reassuring Research Finds an Active Sex Life Won't Increase Risk of Strokes

By Marsh, Beezy | Daily Mail (London), January 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

A Loving Way for Middle-Aged Men to Remain Healthy; Reassuring Research Finds an Active Sex Life Won't Increase Risk of Strokes


Marsh, Beezy, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: BEEZY MARSH

MIDDLE-AGED men were reassured yesterday that sex is not likely to cause a stroke.

In fact, making love regularly may actually reduce the risk of sudden death.

The findings came from a study of the sexual habits and health of more than 900 men of 45 and over.

Researchers found that those who had sex twice or more a week had no greater chance of a stroke than men who were less sexually active.

Rates of fatal heart disease were actually higher among those reporting low to moderate levels of sexual activity, and the gap increased with age.

The link between sex and strokes has been made because the majority of strokes occur late at night or early in the morning and sexual activity is higher at these times.

But project leader Professor Shah Ebrahim, a stroke specialist from the University of Bristol, said: 'Contrary to previous belief that sex may cause a stroke, this study shows there is little evidence on the role of sexual intercourse as a risk factor.

'Men should be heartened to know that they can have sex as many times as they like and it is not likely to result in a stroke. Some protection from heart attack may be an added bonus.'

Dr Ebrahim, whose study was supported by the Stroke Association, looked at 914 men between 45 and 59 in Caerphilly, South Wales.

Of this group, around a quarter had sexual intercourse two or more times a week, while 20 per cent had sex less than once a month. The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, found that frequent sexual intercourse was not likely to result in an increased risk of stroke and may protect against fatal heart attacks.

Other studies have shown that sex can benefit mood and general wellbeing by releasing 'feelgood' chemicals called endorphins. …

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