Predictions Drop for Future Sea-Level Rise

By Monastersky, R. | Science News, December 16, 1989 | Go to article overview

Predictions Drop for Future Sea-Level Rise


Monastersky, R., Science News


Predictions drop for future sea-level rise

Global sea levels are rising and will continue to rise in the future, causing serious problems for low-lying areas. But the ocean will not rise as quickly as predicted, and the West Antarctic ice sheet will not melt in the next century, climate experts said last week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

"We have revised rather drastically our best estimates of how much global sea level will rise due to greenhouse warming," says Mark F. Meier of the University of Colorado at Boulder, who in 1985 chaired a National Research Council committee investigating changes in sea level. He adds, however, that many uncertainties plague these latest predictions.

Scientists believe the expected global warming will partially melt glaciers as well as cause the oceans to expand. According to Meier, the information available in 1985 led his committee to predict that sea levels would rise about 1 meter with a 3[degrees]C increase in global average temperature. At the time, scientists estimated the meter rise would occur by the year 2100, when carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are expected to reach double their 1950 value. The committee also reported the slim possibility that part of the West Antarctic ice sheet could slide into the sea within that time frame, causing a catastrophic rise in sea levels in the next century.

On the basis of information presented last week, Meier says the best predictions now call for a rise of only one-third meter with a doubling of 1950 carbon dioxide levels. This rise should occur before 2100, perhaps by midcentury, he says, because growing levels of other greenhouse gases are also heating the atmosphere.

Recent research on the West Antarctic ice sheet indicates this structure will not disintegrate within the next century, Meier adds. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Predictions Drop for Future Sea-Level Rise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.