Grayslake Students Follow Lead of Explorers

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 24, 2002 | Go to article overview

Grayslake Students Follow Lead of Explorers


Byline: Carolyn Waller

Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, Francisco Pizarro. And, of course, Lewis and Clark.

Little did the explorers know when they sailed for miles to an unknown land that someday the journey would be just a click away.

Fifth-graders in Jennifer Glickley's social studies class and Tim Timmon's science class at Frederick School in Grayslake combined research on early explorers with technology in a recent program called Exploration Exhibition.

Using wireless laptop computers, students designed their reports to not only include maps, photos and written information about each explorer, but also a bibliography page and an author card with a photo and biography of each student author.

Scott Leitwiler chose Jean Baptiste du Sable, who came from Haiti and found the city of Chicago.

"I wanted to do someone I had never heard of before," he said.

Baptiste du Sable was one of the first black explorers who ended up operating a trading post by Lake Michigan in 1884.

For fifth-grader Doug Pate, the choice was Lewis and Clark.

"I wanted to do an explorer who discovered America," Pate said of the duo who traveled 8,000 miles in their journey of the western part of the United States.

Seth Foster said he chose Francisco Pizarro, who sailed in 1528 in South America, because he simply wanted to know more about the explorer.

Pizarro apparently left his home in search of Spanish explorer Hernan Cortez. Pizarro died in 1541.

Explorer John Cabot was the choice for student partners Reba Varghese and Natalia Casillas as well as Patrycja Balka and Adrianna Aranda.

Balka said they had studied many explorers in class before the report was due and they chose Cabot because they did not know much about him.

What they found is Cabot was an Italian who received permission in 1497 from King Henry to explore for what could be a northwest passage across America to Asia.

Cabot left in 1497 and drowned in 1498 on his second voyage.

Varghese said Cabot's son, Sebastian, was part of the crew on the exploration in which Cabot's ship was called Matthew.

Speaking up: Students from Warren Township High School in Gurnee and Grayslake Community High School will be among those participating Feb. 2 in the 2002 Illinois High School Association Regional Speech Tournament in North Chicago. …

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