Maintaining the PASE: A Day in the Life of Sport Education

By Mohr, Derek J.; Townsend, J. Scott et al. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, January 2002 | Go to article overview

Maintaining the PASE: A Day in the Life of Sport Education


Mohr, Derek J., Townsend, J. Scott, Bulger, Sean M., JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Sport education has the potential to revolutionize how sport is taught within school physical education programs. Many physical educators have successfully undertaken the labor-intensive task of designing and implementing a sport education season. The results of these curricular and instructional revisions have benefited the involved students and teachers in relatively convincing fashion (Alexander, Taggart, & Luckman, 1998; Carlson & Hastie, 1997; Hastie, 1998; Hastie, 2000). Due to the complexity of the sport education model, however, physical educators may experience some difficulty in planning, implementing, and evaluating a sport education season for the first time. As sport education continues to increase in popularity, it is imperative that physical educators fully understand the critically important role that lesson planning plays in the successful implementation of a sport education season.

While a considerable amount has been written about sport education in general, much less information is available for physical educators who are in the process of developing daily lesson plans in preparation for a sport education season. Accordingly, physical education teacher educators and practicing teachers must collaborate to establish appropriate guidelines for planning sport education lessons that have the potential to facilitate a student's development as a competent, literate, and enthusiastic sportsperson. This article describes a pedagogical approach to sport education (PASE) and the associated daily events occurring throughout a sport education season for the purpose of providing a systematic framework that will enable physical education teachers to design daily lesson plans within a sport education context. The following sections provide (1) a brief introduction to the sport education model, (2) a rationale for using sport education, (3) an overview of sport education season planning, (4) a descr iption of the daily events that occur within a sport education season, and (5) modifications of daily plans to meet program needs.

Sport Education: An Overview

Sport education is a curriculum and instruction model designed to "provide authentic, educationally rich sport experiences for girls and boys in the context of school physical education" (Siedentop, 1998, p. 18). The sport education model has the primary goal of educating students to be competent, literate, and enthusiastic sportspersons (Sieden top, 1994). In order for students to fully realize this important educational goal, it is recommended that physical educators initiate a number of key curricular revisions while applying a combination of instructional strategies not typically used in traditional approaches to physical education. More specifically, appropriate implementation of the sport education model requires that physical educators (1) extend the length of the basic instructional unit to a season; (2) use a combination of teaching styles, including direct instruction, cooperative learning, and peer teaching; (3) provide multiple and authentic opportunities for skill and strategy practice, applicati on, and assessment; and (4) increase student responsibility by immersing them in the culture and roles associated with a particular sport (Siedentop, 1994, 1998).

The suggested curricular and instructional modifications also include the application of six key features that define what it means to participate in an authentic sport experience. These critical features pertain to the use of extended seasons, team affiliation, formal competition, culminating events, record keeping, and festivity (Siedentop, 1994; Siedentop & Tannehill, 2000). For a more complete description of the sport education model and its associated rationale, see the "Sport Education" feature, published in the April and May/June 1998 issues of JOPERDand see the book, SportEducation: Quality PE Through Positive Sport Experience (Siedentop, 1994). …

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