Olympic Torchbearer Spotlights Labor Abuses. (Nation)

By Lefevere, Patricia | National Catholic Reporter, January 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

Olympic Torchbearer Spotlights Labor Abuses. (Nation)


Lefevere, Patricia, National Catholic Reporter


Leslie Kretzu held high the Olympic Torch as she ran through streets of her native Philadelphia Dec. 22. But what drew more attention than the flaming torch were Kretzu's bare feet.

The 27-year-old social activist chose to run barefoot "as an act of solidarity with workers around the world who are consistently denied their human rights and human dignity while working in factories for U.S. corporations," she told NCR. In keeping with the International Olympic Committee's theme, "Celebrate Humanity," Kretzu said she wanted her participation to represent the millions of unrecognized persons around the globe who produce the uniforms and athletic equipment that will allow athletes to compete in the 2002 Salt Lake City games.

About 11,500 people, many chosen for their public service, are to participate in the torch relay from Athens, Greece, to Salt Lake City.

"The Olympic flame is a great symbol of cleansing hostilities and setting the stage for a world at peace," said Kretzu, who finished her two-tenths of a mile relay in South Philadelphia in 35-degree weather. She spoke of the demands of Nike factory workers to organize and earn a living wage -- rights that she said Nike has not yet addressed.

She also pointed to the Olympic Torch-bearing uniform, which was made in Myanmar (formerly Burma), "a country with one of the worst track records on labor abuses and denial of human rights," Kretzu said.

A 1996 graduate of St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Kretzu credited liberation theology, and Catholic social teaching with prompting her to take such a political stance at a time when millions will have their sights on the games. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Olympic Torchbearer Spotlights Labor Abuses. (Nation)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.