Me and My Computer; Rawdon Messenger Asks Some Personal Questions of Professionals about One of Their Most Meaningful Relationships at Work

By Messenger, Rawdon | The Evening Standard (London, England), January 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

Me and My Computer; Rawdon Messenger Asks Some Personal Questions of Professionals about One of Their Most Meaningful Relationships at Work


Messenger, Rawdon, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: RAWDON MESSENGER

The Office THE personal computer, now 20 years old, has revolutionised almost every profession by bringing the power of computing to the individual.

From designing and communication to analysing and testing, filing and counting, to reporting and recruiting, the chances are you are doing it with keyboard, mouse and monitor. Just the Job asked some professionals what their PC means to them.

Edward Daniels, 28 Assurance executive accountant, Ernst and Young Uses computer about five to six hours a day, with plenty of breaks How does your computer help?

Computers help us work collaboratively with clients from remote locations, saving money and time. All 8,000 of us can keep in touch and share knowledge.

What do you use the internet for? As a vital source of information.

What software do you use?

From typical Microsoft packages to bespoke products.

What kind of relationship do you have with your computer?

Generally good, although it gets fraught when applications are slow.

Denitza Moreau, 29 Architect/designer, Project Orange Spends four to five hours a day on a computer How does your computer help?

Helping produce client presentations. Drawings can be drafted fast and accurately, improving building work.

Increases organisation with computerised timetabling and accounting.

Computers even aid the exploration and development of new architectural concepts.

What do you use the internet for? To search for products, materials and information related to the designs I'm working on, and for the exchange of digital drawings.

What software do you use?

Technical drawing and presentation software.

Microsoft for general admin.

What kind of relationship do you have with your computer?

I often remind myself that computers do not always do what you want them to do, but what you tell them to do.

Paul Lomas, 43 Lawyer, partner at litigation company Freshfields Bruckhaus Derringer Uses a computer between three and eight hours a day How does your computer help?

It alters the way in which lawyers add value. It is easier to run large teams. Client relationships change because joint-working and collaboration increases.

Response times have shortened and the pace of life has increased.

What do you use the internet for? Monitoring client affairs, news, online databases and libraries, discussions, bulletin boards - and booking holidays.

What software do you use?

Windows 2000, email (very heavily), research tools.

What kind of relationship do you have with your computer?

A deep, meaningful one. It is my closest working partner. It is the way I stay in touch with my practice and direct it. It is where I create most of my own legal work and how I distribute it. It enables me to monitor a substantial number of matters. I could not work now without a portable PC.

Paul Scott, 27 Music producer, Hasselhoff Spends up to 20 hours a day at his computer How does your computer help?

The most important tools in music, computers have caused a revolution for musicians and songwriters.

Without them we would be a bunch of happy folk singers. …

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Me and My Computer; Rawdon Messenger Asks Some Personal Questions of Professionals about One of Their Most Meaningful Relationships at Work
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