Surprising Salads with Potatoes (Oven-Fried) and Squash (Scooped out.) (Recipes)

Sunset, January 1990 | Go to article overview

Surprising Salads with Potatoes (Oven-Fried) and Squash (Scooped out.) (Recipes)


Surprising salads with potatoes (oven-fried) and squash (scooped out) To a Westerner, salads are many things served many ways. They frequently harbor unexpected and refreshing combinations of ingredients. Here, we present two such surprising recipes.

The first takes a new look at potato salad. Instead of boiling, you slice the potatoes, oven-fry them to a golden brown color, then serve them warm or at room temperature with a light dressing of balsamic vinegar, parsley, and green onion.

The second salad is a colorful mix of two tender squash: green zucchini and yellow crookneck. You cook them whole to get a pleasantly firm texture, scoop out the seedy centers, and slice to create decorative half-moon shapes.

Serve the salads together, perhaps with cheese and bread for a simple meal; or offer them separately, when your menu calls for potatoes or squash. Both salads use an unusually small amount of oil.

Oven-fried Potato Salad

1-1/2 pounds small (about 1-1/2-in.-diameter) red thin-skinned potatoes About 2 tablespoons olive oil or salad oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion 3 tablespoons minced parsley 1/4 teaspoon pepper Salt

Scrub potatoes and cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices (to brown evenly, slices must be uniformly thick); discard the ends of the potatoes.

Brush 2 baking pans, each 10 by 15 inches, with oil. Arrange slices in a single layer; lightly brush tops of potatoes with more oil. Bake in a 450 [degrees] oven until both sides are deep, golden brown, about 25 minutes. …

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