The Reality of Life at the Sharp End for a Key Player; OPINION: Need for Assembly to Study Responsibility of School Governors

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Reality of Life at the Sharp End for a Key Player; OPINION: Need for Assembly to Study Responsibility of School Governors


Byline: PETER GRIFFIN

IT WOULD be reassuring if one could believe that reforms in the education system, begun in 1986 with new responsibilities for school governors, were the components of a clear vision of the future.

At the time, it looked and felt like separate measures dealing with separate issues. It also felt occasionally vindictive, depending, of course, on where you were sitting.

More responsibilities for governors had all the characteristics of a sideswipe at local authorities.

A National Curriculum would put an end to so-called progressive theories; testing would label schools good or bad, irrespective of the local difficulties; parents would feel a rosy glow, given the freedom to queue at the gates of an apparently successful school.

Years down the line, we still have a National Curriculum, albeit not the one we started with, and it is no longer a heresy to mention alternative curricula, to match particular needs.

Teachers' concerns in 1988 over political control of the curriculum have changed into a more practical concern about the sheer weight of the curriculum, and its concomitant demands of preparation and record-keeping.

In 1986, governors were required to decide, largely on the advice of the head teacher, how much could be spent on a limited range of options. In 2002, governors conduct a review of the head teacher's achievement of personal professional targets for the purpose of deciding the head teacher's salary.

If the apparently disparate components of the system have modified and developed over the years, one clear purpose has certainly emerged, to which they all contribute. Every single school must now find its own salvation.

The system in general may be the stuff of political debate, but the successes and failures of individual schools are precise and public.

Seeking one's own salvation is more practically described as a policy of school improvement. It requires that each school keeps its performance under continuous review; that the decisions which address its needs should be defined in the School Development Plan;

that the governing body should keep the School Development Plan under regular scrutiny.

These are requirements that are taken seriously. Teachers assume responsibility for leadership in particular subjects, researching both the subject and teaching materials, helping and advising colleagues.

The process, from classroom decisions about teaching and learning, to review and discussion in the governing body, is genuine accountability in practice, and is conveyed to parents in the annual report.

There are 26,000 volunteer governors in Wales. A governing body is required to be representative of parents, the LEA, teaching staff, non-teaching staff and coopted members representing particular aspects of the local community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Reality of Life at the Sharp End for a Key Player; OPINION: Need for Assembly to Study Responsibility of School Governors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.