Brain Risk Seen in Sickle Cell Kids

By Weiss, R. | Science News, December 23, 1989 | Go to article overview

Brain Risk Seen in Sickle Cell Kids


Weiss, R., Science News


Brain Risk Seen in Sickle Cell Kids

A new study indicates that children with sickle cell anemia, already at risk of life-threatening infections and strokes, may also suffer significant neuropsychologic deficits. The researchers find that children inheriting the red blood cell disorder have lower IQs and more learning disabilities than do their siblings without the disease -- perhaps as a result of subtle brain damage during their first few years of life.

The study is small and awaits verification -- some of which may come from a federally funded trial now getting underway. If confirmed, the findings could radically alter the prevailing view of sickle cell pathology in children, which today generally attributes any lag in school progress to the psychological stresses and missed school days common among youngsters with the disease.

The research, described in the December PEDIATRICS, is the first published report on the topic since a 1963 study found no significant intellectual differences between sickle cell children and controls. But according to Andrea V. Swift, who led the new study, unpublished data hint that the gap between the two groups has widened during the past two decades. She notes that cognitive scores have remained stagnant in sickle cell kids as a group, while increasing in controls. Because the disease primarily strikes blacks, Swift's team suggests that improved educational opportunities for blacks in recent years may make cognitive differences in afflicted children more apparent.

Swift, then at the University of Georgia in Athens, used a palette of standard psychological tests to measure cognitive abilities in 21 children, 7 to 16 years old, with sickle cell anemia and no known history of neurologic disease. She compared their scores with those of siblings within the same age range who did not inherit the disease. The sickle cell group scored significantly lower than the control group on almost all cognitive measures, report Swift and her colleagues from the University of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Brain Risk Seen in Sickle Cell Kids
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.