Conflict Behaviors toward Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Peers among Male and Female Late Adolescents

By Tezer, Esin; Demir, Ayhan | Adolescence, Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

Conflict Behaviors toward Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Peers among Male and Female Late Adolescents


Tezer, Esin, Demir, Ayhan, Adolescence


ABSTRACT

Differences between males and females in regard to conflict behaviors toward same-sex and opposite-sex peers were examined in a sample of 501 undergraduate university students (326 males, 175 females). They completed a one-page questionnaire containing the theoretical definitions of five conflict behaviors identified by Thomas (1976): competing, avoiding, accommodating, compromising, and collaborating. Students were asked to rate the extent to which they exhibit each of these conflict behaviors, on a 5-point Likert-type scale, separately for same-sex and opposite-sex peers. Results revealed that males reported more competing behavior toward same-sex peers than toward opposite-sex peers, and more avoiding behavior toward opposite-sex peers than toward same-sex peers. Males, compared to females, reported more accommodating behavior toward both same-sex and opposite-sex peers. These findings support the view that preferences regarding conflict behaviors are different for males and females, particularly as exhibi ted toward same-sex and opposite-sex peers.

Adolescence is characterized by both the salience of maintaining peer relationships (Wagner, 1996) and the experience of heightened peer conflicts (Van Slyck, Stem, & Zak-Place, 1996). Conflict, when managed constructively, promotes development, since it may help young people move into deeper, more meaningful relationships with others (Johnson & Johnson, 1996). When managed destructively, however, there may be numerous negative outcomes, such as detachment from school and lower grades (Berndt & Keefe, 1992), lower self-concept (Mild, 1990), undermined self-esteem and self-confidence (Opotow, 1991), and low agreeableness (Graziano, Jensen-Campbell, & Hair, 1996).

Conflict as a relationship variable has generally been defined as a state of incompatible behaviors (Deutsch, 1994). Two dimensions pertinent to conflict management -- concern for self and concern for other, each of which can range from low to high -- have been articulated by many theorists (Blake & Mouton, 1964; Deutsch, 1994; Johnson & Johnson, 1987; Thomas, 1976). Based on these dimensions, five conflict behaviors have been identified: competing, collaborating, compromising, avoiding, and accommodating (Thomas, 1976). Competing is associated with high concern for self and low concern for other; collaborating with high concern for self and other; compromising with intermediate concern for self and other; avoiding with low concern for self and other; and accommodating with low concern for self and high concern for other (Deutsch, 1994). Competing is an attempt to force one's viewpoint on the other party; collaborating seeks to have all parties engage in problem-solving activities to bring the dispute to a mu tually satisfying conclusion; compromising involves the search for a middle-ground solution; avoiding is an attempt to withdraw from the conflict; and accommodating involves giving up one's own needs for the sake of meeting the needs of the other party (Thomas, 1976). It has been proposed that the constructive and destructive consequences of a given conflict are strongly influenced by the behaviors of the participants (Deutsch, 1994; Thomas, 1976).

In exploring adolescents' preferences regarding conflict behaviors, researchers have argued that there is variation by type of relationship (Haar & Krahe, 1999; Laursen & Collins, 1994; Laursen, Hartup, & Koplas, 1996). In other words, conflict resolution strategies differ depending on whether parents, siblings, or peers are involved. For example, a meta-analysis of twelve studies on adolescent conflict management found a high level of submission and disengagement, and a low level of compromise, in parent-adolescent conflict (Larsen, 1993). However, there was considerable compromise and little disengagement with close peers. In general, researchers have found, regardless of methodology, that there are relationship differences in conflict resolution; adolescents and young adults have been found to report more compromising with friends (and less coercion within peer relationships) than with family members and nonfriends in both hypothetical and actual disputes (Laursen, Hartup, & Koplas, 1996). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conflict Behaviors toward Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Peers among Male and Female Late Adolescents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.