Study: Cities with Tougher Liquor Laws Have Fewer Alcohol-Related Traffic Deaths

By Walter, Shane | Nation's Cities Weekly, January 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

Study: Cities with Tougher Liquor Laws Have Fewer Alcohol-Related Traffic Deaths


Walter, Shane, Nation's Cities Weekly


A study by researchers at the RAND Corporation found that cities that had lower fatality rates from alcohol-related traffic deaths generally had stricter liquor laws.

Deborah Cohen, M.D., MPH for RAND, conducted the study and found that cities with nine or fewer of the 20 key alcohol sales regulations had an alcohol fatality rate of close to one and a half times that of areas with 15 or more of the regulations.

"This study points out some of the immediate steps that a city or state agency can implement that are likely to reduce alcohol related traffic deaths," Cohen said.

"Cities and states that today do not control access to alcohol, are not careful about whom they provide alcohol licenses, do not enforce DUI laws with sobriety checks and do not enforce penalties on violations of liquor laws, may be unnecessarily jeopardizing the lives of their citizens," she said.

The study stressed that these four measures could significantly help in reducing alcohol fatality rates in cities. The study used 97 cities across 38 states from 1995 through 1997.

The research concentrated on seven key items: laws governing alcohol accessibility; licensing requirements; disciplinary procedures for liquor law violations; enforcement; policies on DUI; resources available to enforcement officers; and educational efforts by regulatory agencies.

Of the cities used, Lincoln, Neb., Syracuse, N.Y., New York and Madison, Wis., respectively, had the lowest fatality rates during the study, while Dallas, Kansas City, Mo., Albuquerque, N.M., and Nashville-Davidson, Tenn., finished with the highest. The rankings were based on the number of deaths per 100,000 residents and on the number of deaths per 100,000 per daily miles traveled.

As for the four measures to which the study emphasized as helping to lower alcohol fatality rates, the results were as follows:

Alcohol Accessibility

The study measured how difficult it was for residents to buy alcohol. Of the cities participating, 85 percent said they prohibited public drinking, 70 percent prohibited drinking in an automobile and 62 percent prohibited alcohol drive-through services. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Study: Cities with Tougher Liquor Laws Have Fewer Alcohol-Related Traffic Deaths
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.