Game Aims to Recreate Chaos of War

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), December 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Game Aims to Recreate Chaos of War


Byline: MATT COOPER The Register-Guard

When it comes to war, you can take all the technology, the equipment and the boasts about superior firepower, wad it up and throw it out the window.

Give John Fernandes the soldier who follows orders in the face of chaos, the rank-and-file hero who stands his ground when his comrades have fallen.

That's the soldier whom Fernandes sees when he cries. It is also, paradoxically, the soldier who has given Fernandes some measure of relief.

For the past 20 years, Fernandes, a 53-year-old disabled veteran who lives in Eugene, has been a devoted student of the soldier's psyche. His work has culminated in, of all things, a war-simulation game.

He has written an intricate set of game rules by which war buffs can re-create battles from World War II. His rule book, now in distribution through Minnesota-based hobby manufacturer GHQ, is called "World War II Micro Armour: The Game."

You won't find the book on the best-seller list. But more than 600 copies have sold since June to enthusiasts who spend hours - sometimes days - re-creating famous battles with the roll of dice and the movement of tiny military figures across a makeshift battleground.

Most kids with toy soldiers decide victories and defeats largely on stubbornness - that is, who screams the loudest. But even at 12 years old, Fernandes and his pals played war by a set of rules, flipping playing cards and high card wins the battle.

It was later, as Fernandes came of age and joined the military, that he began to understand the human factor in the equation of war.

A Marine from 1976 to 1983, he said he served as an artillery instructor in California, a translator and interrogator of the Chinese and a peacekeeper in Beirut.

The pressure of military service was crippling, leaving Fernandes with post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and other physical ailments. His time in Beirut was especially destructive, he said, leaving him with images of fallen friends that reduce him to tears when he reflects on their bravery.

In war, "it is the human factor that is the most important factor," said Fernandes, a man with lively eyes and a bearded face. "I can't read fiction - the characters don't have anything to win or lose.

"In history, when the Iron Brigade holds off the North Carolina division at the Battle of Gettysburg and suffers 85 percent casualties, this is something that ordinary human beings actually did. The psychology of men under fire became a matter of intense interest to me."

While researching World War II, Fernandes pored over the history books for years - stacks of them sat table-high on either side of him while he read. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Game Aims to Recreate Chaos of War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.