University - Based Entrepreneurs, Intellectual Property, and the Emerging Role of Universities in Economic Development: Research Centers and Institutions Are Undisputedly the Most Important Factor in Incubating High-Tech Industries. (1)

By Gnuschke, John | Business Perspectives, Summer-Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

University - Based Entrepreneurs, Intellectual Property, and the Emerging Role of Universities in Economic Development: Research Centers and Institutions Are Undisputedly the Most Important Factor in Incubating High-Tech Industries. (1)


Gnuschke, John, Business Perspectives


No great city exists without a great university. Centers of economic activity and intellectual activity go hand in hand. In contrast to the past, when university scholars were discouraged from becoming entrepreneurs, a new generation of university faculty is now closing the gap between the world of academic scholarship and economic activity. The purpose of this issue of Business Perspectives is to build on our understanding of the evolving role of intellectual property as an engine for economic growth and prosperity.

Clearly, most of the highest-growth and highest-income areas of the country are linked to applications of intellectual, not physical, capital. (2) Universities have a unique role to play in this emerging environment. Unlike our efforts to separate issues of church and state, universities are being asked-and are in some cases being forced by financial realities-to play a larger role in the economic growth of the communities in which they exist. Some universities have clearly responded by recognizing the value of campus-bas d intellectual activity, while others have not. Some universities have structured business partnerships, licensing agreements, and equity partnerships with the sole intent to gain from the commercial activities of their faculty. Some universities are focusing their activities on research issues that have both academic and commercial applications. But others, locked in traditional structures, have not encouraged--and even continue to discourage--the development of entrepreneurial activities.

Those institutions seem to fear that the traditional academic research and teaching mission of the university will be either tainted or overrun by the "for-profit" component of entrepreneurial adventures. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

University - Based Entrepreneurs, Intellectual Property, and the Emerging Role of Universities in Economic Development: Research Centers and Institutions Are Undisputedly the Most Important Factor in Incubating High-Tech Industries. (1)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.