Public Back Wind Power despite Lack of Policy; ENERGY

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Public Back Wind Power despite Lack of Policy; ENERGY


Byline: STEVE DUBE

THE granting of planning approval for Britain's most powerful wind farm at Cefn Croes near Cwmystwyth was the signpost for a new direction in UK energy policy.

Environmentalists had become increasingly alarmed by the fact that Government ministers had reopened the debate about nuclear power in the light of its commitment to produce 10pc of UK electricity from nonfossil sources by the year 2010.

The hidden costs of security and, crucially, safe storage of nuclear waste for thousands of years make nuclear power the most expensive and potentially dangerous of all, even if it does not create greenhouse gases.

But as the rows continue to rage with no clear solution for our power needs, the Cefn Croes proposals showed that a shift to wind power is considered almost as bad by some green campaigners.

Ceredigion Green Party, the Countryside Council for Wales and the Council for the Preservation of Rural Wales all opposed the plan. They said that the 39 turbines sited on the skyline of the Cambrian Mountains would spoil an area designated as the next National Park without benefiting local people. And they argued that alternative sources of renewable energy are available from solar and tidal power and off-shore wind stations.

Former Ceredigion MP Cynog Dafis, now AM for Mid and West Wales, became unpopular with local residents by supporting the project.

Mr Dafis said the opponents had adopted a preservationist approach to environmental issues and had not taken on board the need to secure energy supplies without the pollution caused by fossil fuels.

"In my view they are insufficiently engaged in the crucial question of sustainable development of which wind energy is a perfect example, " he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Public Back Wind Power despite Lack of Policy; ENERGY
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.