In Remembrance: Richard M. Hodgetts

By Luthans, Fred | Journal of Leadership Studies, Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

In Remembrance: Richard M. Hodgetts


Luthans, Fred, Journal of Leadership Studies


Richard M. Hodgetts
Sun Trust Professor of Business at Florida
International University
Editor, Journal of Leadership Studies
1998-2001

The editorial team of the Journal of Leadership Studies was saddened when our leader, Editor Richard M. Hodgetts, passed away on November 17, 2001 after a battle with cancer. Under Richard's excellent editorial leadership, JLS is attaining his stated goal of making JLS a major reference source for researchers, teachers, and practitioners. He will be sorely missed, but his contribution to JLS will live on into the future. Below, Fred Luthans -- a long-time best friend and collaborator, the lead article in this very issue being an example -- pays tribute to Richard's legacy as an educator and scholar.

The Legacy of Richard M. Hodgetts
Distinguished Management Educator
By Fred Luthans

When Richard Hodgetts passed away on November 17, 2001, his immediate family lost a devoted husband (over 30 years of marriage to his wife Sally), father (two grown children Steven and Jennifer), brother (to John and William) and uncle (to a number of nieces and nephews). In addition, many, many of us lost a great friend and colleague, and the field of management lost a very significant contributor. When I delivered his eulogy, I noted that his lasting legacy was threefold: friends, work and family. Anyone who knew Richard personally would attest to the importance of family and friends in his life. As a friend, I will never forget his humor, trust, courage, and compassion and family was number one in his life. For this remembrance, however, I will focus on his work.

Richard truly represented the Distinguished Educator Award given to him a couple of years ago by the Academy of Management. The Academy membership includes almost all management professors in the U.S. and a growing number from around the world. As Academy of Management President-elect and member of the JLS Editorial Board Rosalie Tung noted, "In light of Richard's many contributions to the development and advancement of management education both here and abroad, I cannot think of anyone within the Academy of Management who is more qualified for this award than Richard." Very briefly, I will try to highlight some of his many contributions as a management educator.

First, in the area of developing students at all levels -- undergraduate, MBA, management development and doctoral -- Richard could serve as an excellent role model for all educators. Most undergrads that had Richard simply remember him as being "the best professor I have ever had." As Dan Wren, the well-known management historian noted, "Richard is one of the most entertaining teachers I've met who combines content and humor in such a fashion that it is impossible to miss his basic message." He has won every outstanding teaching award available. For example, even this year he was voted the Faculty Member of the Year Award by the executive MBA students. …

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