The Information Professional - an Unparalleled Resource: The Special Libraries Association 81st Annual Conference Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania June 9-14, 1990

Special Libraries, Winter 1990 | Go to article overview

The Information Professional - an Unparalleled Resource: The Special Libraries Association 81st Annual Conference Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania June 9-14, 1990


The Information Professional--An Unparalleled Resource

The Special Libraries Association 81st Annual Conference Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania June 9-14, 1990

For six days in June (9-14), 1990, Pittsburgh, PA will be the site of the 81st Annual Conference of SLA. Attendees will have an unparalleled opportunity to celebrate the continued enhancement of the information professional and the expectations created while being in the forefront of today's ever expanding technological frontier.

The 1990 annual conference theme is "The Information Professional--An Unparalleled Resource." One should see the program organizer's desire for a renewed emphasis on the individual and what he/she can offer the profession and the organization for which they work reflected in the conference title. The theme also reflects a growing pride in the profession and a recognition of the value placed on its members by their respective organizations and the members themselves.

The broad scope of programs planned for the conference week will provide an enriching experience for all who attend. Expert speakers are being engaged. Social events are being organized to provide each attendee a chance to relax, enjoy, and learn. Attendees will have the opportunity to choose from programs specifically designed to enhance management skills, career development, and understanding of new technologies.

A number of conference activities from program content to tours to the exhibit are highlighted on the following pages.

Plan to attend now.

General Sessions

SLA is pleased to announce two outstanding speakers have been engaged for the general sessions on Monday and Tuesday, June 11 and 12, 1990: Richard Saul Wurman, author of Information Anxiety and Patricia Aburdene, co-author with John Naisbitt of Megatrends 2,000.

Patricia Aburdene, co-author with John Naisbitt of Re-Inventing the Corporation and collaborator on the international best-seller Megatrends, is a leading authority on the future of the American corporation and the impact of social and economic trends on corporations and non-profit institutions. Ms. Aburdene specializes in monitoring the new leadership style the men and women of today's information economy are developing in response to the megatrends of today's business environment--a new, better-educated workforce, a shrinking pool of skilled labor, entrepreneurship, and increased competition in areas such as health care.

Aburdene holds a B.A. from Newton College of the Sacred Heart in philosophy and an M.S. in library and information science from Catholic University of America. She is president of the Board of Search for Common Ground, a think tank seeking alternative methods for national security, and is a founder and director of the Bellwether Foundation, which funds leading-edge projects.

Richard Saul Wurman is co-owner of AccessPress Ltd., and president of The Understanding Business. He is a regular consultant to major corporations in matters relating to the design and understanding of information and communications.

Wurman, is an architect, graphic designer, cartographer, and recipient of AIA Guggenheim, Graham, Chandler, and NEA fellowships. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Architecture.

With the publication of his first book, Mr. Wurman began what he describes as the singular passion of his life--that of making information understandable. In his 45th book, Information Anxiety, he has developed an overview of the motivating principles found in his previous works. Each project has focused on some subject or idea that he personally had difficulty understanding. His work stems from his desire to know, rather than from his already knowing--from his ignorance rather than his intelligence, from his inability rather than ability.

Division and Committee Programs

The core of SLA's conference is the business and informational sessions developed by SLA committees and divisions. …

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