Home on the Page. (News and Trends)

By Gips, Michael A. | Security Management, February 2002 | Go to article overview

Home on the Page. (News and Trends)


Gips, Michael A., Security Management


www.securitymanagement.com

September 11 has fueled an unprecedented amount of security-related activity in both the public and private sectors. Businesses, government agencies, associations, interest groups, and other entities are churning out surveys, checklists, fact sheets, and other information. Here's what's new this month. Get there by going to Security Management Online at www.securitymanagement.com. Click on "Beyond Print" and scroll to "News & Trends," then down to "Home on the Page." Also look for the @ symbol in the magazine for more online links.

Terrorism. Since the September terrorist attacks, numerous congressional hearings have addressed the issue. The U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) has been among the agencies frequently asked to express its views.

Nancy Kingsbury, managing director of GAO's Applied Research and Methods, testified before the Subcommittee on National Security, Veterans' Affairs, and International Relations, House Committee on Government Reform that the Department of Defense had not "systematically examined, the current distribution of medical personnel across specialties with respect to adequacy for chemical and biological defense." And the GAO's Janet Heinrich, director, health care--public health issues, summarized for the House Committee on Energy and Commerce the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's research and preparedness activities on bioterrorism.

Both branches of Congress also heard from GAO experts about terrorism insurance. Thomas J. McCool, managing director, financial markets and community investment, described for the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs some features of insurance programs that cover catastrophic or terrorist events. Examples include insurance for catastrophic nuclear accidents, overseas political risk, and urban riots and civil disorder. These and other related testimonies are available at SM Online.

School crime. The mid- to late nineties is considered by some to be the bloodiest period in the history of U.S. schools. Yet victimization in U.S. schools declined by about one-third between 1992 to 1999, from 48 crimes per 1,000 students ages 12 to 18 to 33 crimes per 1,000 students m that age group. Also according to Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2001, a joint report by the departments of Justice and Education, between and 1999, the number of students in grades 9 through 12 who reported carrying a weapon on school property during the previous 30 days fell from percent to 7 percent. However, in that same time period, the percentage of students in that grade range who were threatened or injured with a weapon on school property remained constant--between 7 percent and 8 percent. The fourth annual report in a series, Indicators 2001 contains data on such topics as fights at school, use of alcohol and marijuana, and nonfatal teacher victimization. SM Online has the report.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidelines on preventing unintentional injuries and violence at school. Of particular interest to security professionals will be guidelines designed to improve crisis and emergency response, counseling and social services, involvement of families and communities, and staff involvement to prevent violence. The guidelines are on SM Online.

Money laundering. Banks, which accept cash and perform funds transfers, are the typical choice of money launderers. But because of its large, active, and Liquid nature, the U. …

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