The Wimp's Father

Manila Bulletin, February 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Wimp's Father


MEXICO D.F. - Is it true that Pres. George W. Bush called President Megawati of Indonesia a wimp? According to news reports, he made that rude comment to Pres. Gloria Arroyo after he received her unconditional support for his "war against terror." With a father like Sukarno, how could anyone be a wimp?

Perhaps, in the eyes of crafty American policymakers, Sukarno was a tad more defiant than Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia. After all, Indonesia is an archipelago of more than 13,000 islands, scattered across the strategic sea lanes between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Though it is the world's largest Muslim nation, that was neither an asset nor a liability way back in 1945 when Indonesia became independent. Or ten years later, when it was expected to support US intervention in Vietnam. The unconditional imperative of America then was to keep as many countries in the "free world," away from "communist terror" safely ensconced in the Western "sphere of influence." However, Sukarno had his peculiar vision of Asia and Indonesia's role in a bipolar world where "balance of power" seemed crucial. He was not eager to toe the American line even if the USA was supportive of Indonesia's anti-colonial struggle, specially when this issue was presented before the United Nations, Surprisingly enough, the USA said it was a nationalist, anti-colonial struggle and went as far as threatening to exclude the Netherlands from the Marshall Plan if it did not respect Indonesia's independence. No wonder erstwhile US Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles, considered the Indonesian leader such an ungrateful, pain in the neck.

Sukarno described Indonesia's foreign policy as "independent and active," a principle found in the preamble of the 1945 Constitution. Indonesia championed the abolition of colonialism in all its forms and the creation of a new, independent world order based on peace and social justice. Through the years, Sukarno used the "independent and active" foreign policy to shepherd his country through the political pitfalls of the Cold War, avoiding alliances that compromised Indonesia's sovereignty and rejecting economic bounties that obviated independent decisions. Sukarno emphasized that the "active" element of the policy consisted in Indonesia's vigorous support for national liberation and self-determination movements, for its continued struggle against colonialism and its attempts to forge strong and lasting ties with Asian and African countries. Furthermore, Indonesia was committed to regional and world peace and global "distention" as a member of the DjakartaPhnompenh-Hanoi-PekingPyongyang axis of the New Emerging Forces (NEFOS). So, notwithstanding the 1952 Mutual Security Act with the USA, Indonesia refused to get involved in the Korean War and did not support American intervention in Vietnam. When the Southeast Asian Treaty Organization (SEATO) was formed, in 1954, at the behest of the USA and to justify its involvement in Vietnam, Indonesia refused to became a member. Perhaps, Sukarno saw through America's plans because the original roster of SEATO members included four non-Asian countries- England, France, Australia, New Zealand - and only three Asian ones-the Philippines, Pakistan and Thailand. Instead, Indonesia signed trade agreements with People's China, established diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union and other socialist states, gave Chinese dual citizenship and reneged on the obligations imposed by the USA and Netherlands at the time of independence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Wimp's Father
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.