Language Skills Pump Up Your Pay Packet

By Whitney, Linda | Daily Mail (London), February 28, 2002 | Go to article overview

Language Skills Pump Up Your Pay Packet


Whitney, Linda, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: LINDA WHITNEY

LEARNING another language can boost your job prospects as never before. For as well as traditional careers such as teaching, interpreting and translating, there are plenty of jobs for language specialists in industry and commerce.

In fact, only one in ten careers with languages is in fields such as interpreting and translating.

Languages can boost your pay as well as your prospects: research shows that linguists' salaries are on average 8 per cent higher than workers without language skills.

Now that companies are going global, and the UK is increasingly tied to Europe, being able to speak another language can mean that UK and foreign employers are beating a path to your door.

'English speakers with other languages will find their market value rising fast,' says Mark Freebairn of Martin Ward Anderson, the specialist financial recruitment company with branches in the UK and mainland Europe.

'Many big companies now have subsidiaries or offices all over Europe and they want people who can communicate between them.

'People with several languages are relatively common in the rest of Europe but not here, so companies are desperately seeking people with English as a first language but who also speak others.' SIMPLY being able to converse in another language is no longer enough, says Bernadette Byrne of thebigword, a language management company in Leeds which provides interpreting and translation services.

'You have to have some other kind of expertise as well. For instance, translators are usually specialists in some other field such as medicine or finance.

'A company making prosthetics for use by surgeons internationally needs the instructions to be translated exactly right - getting it wrong could kill.

Financial translators are usually trained in finance, too. Skills like these command the highest pay rates.' Pascale Mourier of thebigword adds: 'If you want to use your languages in business, good sectors to aim for include customer services, sales, business development, import/export, financial and accountancy, and IT.

'The internet has opened up lots of new jobs for linguists designing or translating websites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Language Skills Pump Up Your Pay Packet
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.