How to Honor Pearl

By Massing, Michael | The Nation, March 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

How to Honor Pearl


Massing, Michael, The Nation


Watching the investigation into the abduction of Daniel Pearl, I felt uneasy about the endless public statements put out by Pakistani authorities. They seemed hopelessly confusing and contradictory: Pearl's body had just been found, we were told one day; he was about to be freed, we heard on another. In addition to conveying ineptitude, this compulsive sharing of information seemed entirely counterproductive. Wasn't it helping the kidnappers?

The Pakistanis' profligacy with information reflected the extraordinary pressure they were under--from the US government as well as the international press. The urgent demands that the Pakistani government solve the case, and President Musharraf's eagerness to please Washington, no doubt contributed to the apparent sloppiness of the investigation. Nonetheless, the Bush Administration deserves credit for making the case a high priority. Its efforts seem far preferable to the "quiet diplomacy" pursued by the Reagan Administration in the case of the hostages held in Lebanon (including AP correspondent Terry Anderson)--a policy that allowed them to languish in horrible isolation for years.

But the Administration's admirable stance in the Pearl case contrasts sharply with its general dealings with the press since September 11. Over and over, the Administration has shown its hostility toward, and contempt for, the type of reporting Pearl was doing in Karachi. In Washington, the Pentagon has imposed stringent controls on the flow of information available to reporters, while in Afghanistan it has strictly limited their access to US military personnel. In one chilling incident, a US serviceman threatened to shoot Washington Post reporter Doug Struck for being too inquisitive.

Then there's the litany of Administration efforts to suppress news: Condoleezza Rice's urging the networks not to run the interviews with Osama bin Laden; the State Department's demand that Voice of America not air an interview with Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar; and Colin Powell's suggestion to the Emir of Qatar that he rein in the Al-Jazeera satellite station.

Such actions are watched closely around the world. In Zimbabwe, for instance, Information Minister Jonathan Moyo, seeking to justify his government's attacks on its journalists, said, "If the most celebrated democracies in the world won't allow their national interests to be tampered with, we will not allow it too." He went on to denounce his country's independent journalists as "terrorists," a label used to justify the use of violence and torture against them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How to Honor Pearl
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.