What Skills Are Needed in Workplace?

By Young, Doyle | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 3, 2002 | Go to article overview

What Skills Are Needed in Workplace?


Young, Doyle, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Doyle Young Special to the Daily Herald

Editor's note: With this issue, we introduce "Workplace Success," a new column focusing on topics that workers can use to improve their skills and careers and managers can use to improve their bottom line. The column is written by Doyle Young, vice president of ACT's Workforce Delivery Division and a noted author and speaker.

You've probably heard the expression. "It's not what you know; it's who you know." There is some truth to this old slogan when it comes to building careers. Networking is an important part of success in a business career.

There is another expression that's probably more important. "It's not what you know; it's what you can do."

It's probably truer today than it ever has been. Study after study shows that the people who have skills go further in the workplace. A college degree is no longer a guarantee of a job. Skills are required, degree or no degree.

Employees are no longer tying their futures to their companies anymore, either. They're tying their futures to their skills.

But what skills should every person possess? ACT researchers set out to find that answer a decade ago. They brought together industry leaders in education, business, and government. After years of research, it was concluded that eight skill areas were most needed in the workplace: applied mathematics, applied technology, listening, locating information, observation, reading for information, teamwork and writing.

Don't most people possess these skills? After all, we learn math, reading and writing in school. But there's a twist on what businesses want today: They want people who can apply these things. The ability to use critical thinking skills to apply knowledge on the job, to creatively handle assignments and problems, is something too many graduates don't learn in class.

Let's take three of the most important skills and break them down.

Applied Mathematics: At the most basic level, employers want workers to be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide. But the majority of employers also want their workers to be able to calculate averages, ratios and proportions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Skills Are Needed in Workplace?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.