Legal Aid Resists Being Reined in, Meese Testifies; Congress Ordered Political Reforms

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Legal Aid Resists Being Reined in, Meese Testifies; Congress Ordered Political Reforms


Byline: Amy Fagan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Legal Services Corp. has failed to curb its political activities as Congress demanded six years ago, former U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese III said yesterday in testimony at an oversight hearing.

The publicly funded agency that distributes grant money for the legal defense of poor Americans has not increased competition among its local grant recipients and has disregarded Congress' prohibition of its involvement in class-action lawsuits, Mr. Meese told the House Judiciary subcommittee on commercial and administrative law.

Mr. Meese currently heads the center for legal and judicial studies at the Heritage Foundation.

LSC spokesman Eric Kleiman said competition has indeed increased and that the LSC "will not allow any group receiving LSC funding to participate in a class-action lawsuit."

"I think there have been some good changes made, but some real problems persist," said Rep. Bob Barr, Georgia Republican, who called the hearing as chairman of the subcommittee.

President Bush is expected to announce replacements to the current Clinton-era LSC board members soon, and Mr. Barr wants to ensure the White House will "get people on that board that really take these reforms seriously."

Created in 1974, the LSC gives grants to local organizations that provide legal services to poor Americans. But Republicans complained for years that LSC pursues liberal political causes through its lawsuits - prompting Congress to enact reforms in 1996 intended to restrict LSC's political activities.

Mr. Meese said the LSC continues to allow its grantees to take cases of aliens who are not physically present in the United States, even though Congress prohibited such action.

The LSC convened a commission to examine the issue, Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Legal Aid Resists Being Reined in, Meese Testifies; Congress Ordered Political Reforms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.