Tragic Script


ERIC Berne, founder of Transactional Analysis, once observed that, like actors on a stage, our behavior is scripted. The plot of our life can be comic or tragic, depending on the scripts we follow.

Many of us lament the role we play. We endlessly rebel, even rage against it. We think we deserve a better part. But such grumbling and whining are vain. After all, we are the main authors of our life scripts. Parents, peers, authority figures, and environment may help us compose it, but it is mainly our conscious and subconscious choices that shape it.

Do you always find yourself in trouble? Do you always miss out on opportunities? Do you always find yourself at the right place but at the wrong time? Do you jump from one relationship to another? Are you always broke? Don't blame fate or destiny for this. We go through the same life patterns repeatedly, not because we are destined to do so, but because we have embedded such patterns in our life scripts. If we reap blessings and rewards, it must be because we have filled our life scripts with good will and hard work. We attract what we expect. If we suffer from pain and humiliation because of a bad deed, it is not because God is punishing us. Evil brings its own punishment.

These days, the media is obsessed with tragic and melodramatic life scripts. Television and newspapers focus on sad and angry people whose lives consist of chronic patterns of failure, sickness, humiliation, or depression. As they face the camera, they wail and weep as though they have been ravaged by cruel fate. …

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