'The Negro Project'; Planned Parenthood's Philosophy Isn't What You Think

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 8, 2002 | Go to article overview

'The Negro Project'; Planned Parenthood's Philosophy Isn't What You Think


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Before we get any further into Black History Month, I thought I'd help pass on some information of significance. This is not to belittle what others have said or might say. It's just that, well, so much of what black history really means to America has been commercialized or reduced to trivial pursuits of the first black this and the first black that. And, although we still need to be reminded of the short distance between here and not-so-far-back there, we also occasionally need to take stock. So here goes.

You know who the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was, and most of us know, or at least think we know, what he stood for, right? I said "think we know" because I offer up what portends to be a little-known black history fact. Margaret Higgins Sanger, the mother of Planned Parenthood and grand dame of latter-day women's lib balderdash, hoodwinked the good reverend doctor - who, in his May 1966 acceptance speech of the Margaret Sanger Award, granted by Planned Parenthood Federation of America, mentioned a striking "kinship between our [civil rights movement] and Margaret Sanger's early efforts." Poor King, moving orator though he was, misspoke.

First, a little about the socialist herself. Sanger, born in 1879 into an Irish Catholic family, was encouraged by her father to be a nonconformist. While in nursing school, she married architect William Sanger and they had three children. The Sangers first lived for many years in Hastings, an affluent suburb of Westchester, N.Y., but her wanderlust lured her to New York City. As a visiting nurse on the Lower East Side, it was there that she adopted the cause of birth-control (and, shh, abortion) as one sidebar to her eugenics-based radicalism after a poor woman died following an "unwanted" pregnancy. In 1916, Sanger opened her first birth-control clinic, an illegal birth-control clinic, setting in motion abominable ends to the beauty of giving life.

Over three generations, Sanger founded the Birth Control Review, which regularly published pro-eugenics writings. Also during that time, she was jailed for passing on obscene literature and chastised repeatedly by the religious community. She had even shamelessly abandoned her own family in the name of, ahem, the cause, and took up with several men - including the English novelist H.G. Wells - and fled America to avoid prosecution. Undeterred and unbowed, Sanger and a precursor to Planned Parenthood, the Birth Control Federation of America, decided to turn their attention to black folk. They devised a plan for an "experimental" clinic that Sanger said would "reduce the birth rate among ... elements unable to provide for themselves, and the burden of which we are all forced to carry," writes Tanya L. Green, author of "The Negro Project: Margaret Sanger's Eugenic Plan for Black Americans. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'The Negro Project'; Planned Parenthood's Philosophy Isn't What You Think
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.