[0] Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2000-2001

By Wachter, Phyllis E.; Schultz, William Todd | Biography, Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

[0] Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2000-2001


Wachter, Phyllis E., Schultz, William Todd, Biography


WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF STEFANIE PAGE

DISSERTATIONS

Abraham, Keshia Nicole. "Revolting Women W/righting Worlds: Blackwomen Writing Autobiography as Resistance." SUNY-Binghampton, 2001. DAI 62/03-A (Sept. 2001): 1002.

Explores how twentieth-century Blackwomen in the African diaspora have created modes of survival for living within dominating societies without adopting their ideologies.

Al-Samman, Hanadi. "Diasporic Na(rra)tions: Arab Women Rewriting Exile." Indiana U, 2000. DAI 16/07-A (Jan. 2001): 2742.

Focusing on the genres of travel literature, autobiography, fantasy, and war narrative, examines the use of postmodern theories of identity formation, deconstruction, nationhood, and postcolonialism in the metanarratives of exiled Arab female writers.

Ash, Jennifer Frances. "'Holy Virility': Masquerading Masculinity in the Autobiographical Texts of Augustine of Hippo and Henry Suso." Northwestern U, 2000. DAI 61/06-A (Dec. 2000): 2346.

Compares subjectivity and masculinity in early and late medieval Christianity as represented by Augustine's Confessions and Suso's Life of the Servant.

Ashford, Tomeiko Rashun. "'Daughters of Zion': Spiritual Power in Black Womanist Narrative." U of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 2000. DAI 61/11-A (May 2001): 4382.

Connects historical and methodological frameworks developed in 19th century conversion narratives by Zilpha Elaw and Virginia Broughton to womanist theology in contemporary works by Gloria Naylor, Gayl Jones, Ann Allen Shockley, and Octavia Butler.

Badia, Janet Lee. "Private Detail, Public Spectacle: Sylvia Plath's and Anne Sexton's Confessional Poetics and the Politics of Reception." Ohio State U, 2000. DAI 61/11-A (May 2001): 4383.

Considers the influence of the critical history of confessional poetry on the publication, marketing, and reception of Plath's and Sexton's work, while recovering from that history the figure of the marginalized woman reader and the practice of reading poetry as autobiography.

Beebe, Ann Caroline. "'If You Had Nothing in the World But Your Brothers': Sibling Relations in the Civil War Diaries of Young Women." U of Kentucky, 2000. DAI 61/07-A (Jan. 2001): 2709.

Reads the diaries as both historical accounts and works of literature that allow the authors to participate in the national conflict while creating self-images as sisters.

Blake, Dale Selma. "Inuit Autobiography: Challenging the Stereotypes." U of Alberta, 2000. DAI62/05-A (Nov. 2001): 1828.

Studies eight Inuit autobiographers writing between 1894 and 1993 for the effects of hybridity on self-fashioning, as the Inuit autobiographical self adjusts to changing material and ideological circumstances.

Brody, Jeanne. "The Painter as History: The Evolution of Gustave Courbet's Exhibition Strategy." U of Delaware, 2001. DAI62/05-A (Nov. 2001): 1615.

Proposes that Courbet used exhibitions to construct a personal narrative and visual history of his art, life, and career, creating an autobiography of himself as a persecuted outsider.

Brown, Linda Joyce. "Becoming White, Becoming Other, Becoming American: Racial Formation and the Literature of Immigration during the Late Progressive Era." U of New Mexico, 2001. DAI 62/02-A Aug. 2001): 571.

Examines how early twentieth century texts by or about women immigrants-particularly works by Mary Antin, Sui Sin Far, and Willa Cather--constructed racial, ethnic, and national subjectivities.

Burgess, Maureen Alana. "'Reforming' the Native: Frontier Activism and Women's Autobiography in the Progressive Era." Ohio State U, 2000. DAI61.05-A (Nov. 2000): 1837.

Shows how women's political culture during the Progressive Era engaged popular attitudes about race and gender, savagery and civilization, and culture and citizenship as part of a nationalist agenda.

Bush, Laura L. …

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