How Can Developing Countries Benefit More from the Multilateral Trading System? (Trade as a Tool for Development)

By Belisle, J. Denis | International Trade Forum, October-December 2001 | Go to article overview

How Can Developing Countries Benefit More from the Multilateral Trading System? (Trade as a Tool for Development)


Belisle, J. Denis, International Trade Forum


ITC firmly believes in trade as a tool for development. In order for developing countries and transition economies to increase their participation in global trade, they need to focus on three export prerequisites: market access, marketable goods and services to export and export skills. (Trade as a tool for development)

A great deal is being said about globalization and what developing countries and transition economies should do to participate more fully in the world economy. But what specifically needs to be done? In my view, there are three pre requisites to enable developing countries to fully participate in the world economy. They are:

* market access;

* goods and services to export; and

* export skills.

Changing scene

Market access is negotiated between countries. In the past it has often been difficult for developing country suppliers to obtain access to markets in industrialized countries, which have tended to favour their own country's suppliers. This is changing. Recent initiatives by the European Union, the United States and the Fourth World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November are providing new impetus to substantially increase market access for developing countries in areas where they can best compete.

The second requirement is having marketable goods and services to export. These result from creativity, innovation, technology and capital investment which are critical elements for success.

Creativity exists in abundance in developing countries. Indeed, time and time again, these countries have found highly innovative and imaginative ways to tackle situations that are dealt with more traditionally by industrialized societies. Putting this capital of imagination and creativity to work for export is something developing countries need to do more systematically.

The cost of access to technology, particularly new information technology (IT) is falling all the time. Last year, the Executive Forum organized by ITC in Montreux, Switzerland, focused on "Export Development in the Digital Economy". It gave plenty of examples of developing country exporters who have entered world markets through the creative use of information technology.

The key: good ideas

Capital is equally important. Even in these difficult times, it is interesting to see how much capital from around the world is being directed at seeking out good ideas, large numbers of which will be found in developing countries.

I believe this is a trend that will both continue and strengthen in coming years. There was a time when big firms, or big fish (for the sake of illustration) used to eat small fish; nowadays fast fish eat slow fish and these fast fish are found in both North and South. Fast fish are the result of creativity, innovation, technology and capital.

In my view, this is where developing countries have a unique opportunity to win a greater share of the global economy. ITC can help these countries improve their responsiveness to new demands by assisting with identifying new markets, pointing to opportunities to adapt and diversify products and by focusing entrepreneurs' attention on the export potential of the services sector, which is one of the fastest-growing areas of world trade. This will be further enhanced by the use of appropriate information technologies. As a result of improved telecommunications coverage, it is foreseen that increasingly many call centres, back office services, information services, as well as data-entry and processing functions will be located in developing countries.

Export skills

The third requirement for countries to be able to succeed in export markets is possessing both export skills and the ability to deliver export products and services. These are just as important as market access, since on its own, market access makes little difference. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Can Developing Countries Benefit More from the Multilateral Trading System? (Trade as a Tool for Development)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.