Malaca?ang Has Survived 105 Years of Invasions & Rebellions

Manila Bulletin, March 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

Malaca?ang Has Survived 105 Years of Invasions & Rebellions


MALACA?ANG was derived from the Tagalog phrase may lakan diyan (there are nobles there) or malakan-iyan (place of the chief), or from the Spanish phrase mala ca?a (bad cane) - bad because of the wrong belief that the bamboo groves around there were inhabited by evil spirits. Look, it has survived despite interspersing invasions and rebellions in 105 years. It just celebrated its anniversary yesterday led by Pres. Asst. for Education Mona Valisno in Mala ca?a.

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With FBI Director Robert Mueller's revelation that Bin Laden's terrorist network might seek refuge in the Philippines and six other countries in the Asia-Pacific region, whether the additional 800 or 1000 US personnel allegedly to do civic work in this country are in fact "covered" combatants to augment the US troops already present here, we should welcome the new arrivals. We can only doubt the certainty of Mueller's warning at our risk.

***

One newspaper (not this) quoted Sen. President Drilon as saying that Sen. Cayetano should have at lest 13 majority senators to back him before he could take over the Senate presidency next year pursuant to their power-sharing agreement. This statement seemed to imply that unless Cayetano could get that number of support, the term-sharing would not be implemented. Of course, if the opposition took over, that agreement would just remain as a waste paper.

***

Since close to 15,000 deportees from Sabah, Malaysia are mostly natives of Bongao (Tawi-Tawi), Jolo (Sulu), and Cotabato, the government agencies concerned, such as DFA, DOLE, and DSWD, should facilitate their return home. The Zamboanga City council's request that the national government take care of those deportees should be acted at once, especially at this time when the city is crowded with Basilan evacuees, and the US special forces to boot. …

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