Lock Down That Laptop All the Time

By Stansel, Ed | The Florida Times Union, March 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

Lock Down That Laptop All the Time


Stansel, Ed, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Ed Stansel, Times-Union staff writer

Laptop computers have a tendency to walk away when you're not watching.

They're tempting targets for thieves, and not just for their resale value. Think of all the sensitive information you might have on your computer -- tax records, account numbers, passwords, PINs and Social Security numbers. Not to mention love letters or uncomplimentary e-mail about your boss.

A thief who gets hold of your laptop might be able to steal your identity, your money and your employer's secrets.

Veteran business travelers have learned to keep a death grip on their laptops. Even when going through airport security, they watch their computer bags at all times -- which can be difficult when you're asked to remove your socks.

A variety of companies offer hardware and software products aimed at keeping your laptop safe from thieves, or helping you recover it if it is stolen.

These products range from the simple -- locking cables that plug into the security slot on laptops -- to the high-tech, such as costly biometric devices that scan your fingerprint.

One of the latest entries in this market is Caveo Anti-Theft. This $99 PC card from Caveo Technology (www.caveo.com) has a built-in motion detector that senses when the laptop has traveled beyond a distance set by the user. The card triggers an alarm and then locks up the operating system and encrypts sensitive data.

Even if the card is ejected from your laptop, the computer will remain inaccessible to thieves. Users can adjust the settings to avoid false alarms, or switch off the motion sensor when they're in a car or on a plane. Caveo Anti-Theft is for Windows machines.

On the software end, Brigadoon Software (www.brigadoonsoftware.com) has just released PC PhoneHome, a program that runs invisibly on Windows PCs and Macs. Each time the computer connects to the Internet, it sends a "stealth" e-mail to any address you choose, listing the IP (or Internet protocol) address of the computer, the time the computer logged on, the serial number of the machine and other information that could be helpful to law enforcement agencies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lock Down That Laptop All the Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.