The Tree That Marked a Piece of Our Past

By Meyer, Jeff | American Forests, Autumn 2001 | Go to article overview

The Tree That Marked a Piece of Our Past


Meyer, Jeff, American Forests


"I was born upon the prairie, where the wind blew free and there was nothing to break the light of the sun. I was born where there were no enclosures and where everything drew a free breath. I want to die there and not within walls. I know every stream and every wood between the Rio Grande and the Arkansas. I have hunted and lived all over that country. I lived like my fathers before me, and like them. I lived happily."

-Parra Wa-Samen (Ten Bears) of the Yamparika Comanches, quoted in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Look at the cities and suburbs of the modern American Plains and the Southwest, and it's hard to imagine life there just 200 years ago. These Plains were the territory of the Comanche, whose name means "enemy" in the Ute language. Unlike many Native American tribes, the Comanches were warriors and wandereres, made up of as many as 38 bands related only by loose friendship.

When you migrate, buffalo hunt, and fight for a living, you need good campsites marked out for you; both Comanche and Cheyenne did that for their fellow tribesmen. A good campsite had to be near running water (as a source of water and fish), had to have tall bluffs or hills on at least three sides for lookouts, and very often bad a pecan grove. Not only were pecans widely used for food and dye, a grove often signaled good soil for other fruits and berries and abundant wildlife to eat them.

When they found a great campsite in which to set up their teepees, they would find a young pecan tree, usually 3 to 5 feet tall, and bend it, staking the top to the ground. The tree would thus become a marker" tree, growing horizontally along the ground before continuing to grow vertically. This marked a campground for generations to come. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Tree That Marked a Piece of Our Past
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.