Sustained Silent Reading Experiences among Korean Teachers of English as a Foreign Language: The Effect of a Single Exposure to Interesting, Comprehensible Reading

By Cho, Kyung-Sook; Krashen, Stephen | Reading Improvement, Winter 2001 | Go to article overview

Sustained Silent Reading Experiences among Korean Teachers of English as a Foreign Language: The Effect of a Single Exposure to Interesting, Comprehensible Reading


Cho, Kyung-Sook, Krashen, Stephen, Reading Improvement


A single positive experience in self-selected reading of children's books resulted in a profound change in attitudes toward recreational reading among Korean teachers of English as a foreign language. Before the experience, few teachers reported that they did recreational reading in English. After the experience, nearly all teachers reported that they were interested in using sustained silent reading in their classes, and were interested in reading more in English on their own.

**********

It has been repeatedly demonstrated that reading, especially free voluntary reading, helps improve vocabulary, reading comprehension, grammar, and writing, not only among first language acquirers but also among second language acquirers (Elley and Mangubhai, 1983; Krashen, 1993; Cho and Krashen, 1994, 1995; Mason and Krashen, 1997). Free voluntary reading is especially useful in the English as a foreign language (EFL) situation, where other sources of input may not be readily available (Cho & Kim, 1999; Krashen, 1997). Most EFL students, however, do not read English, even though many are interested in improving (H. Kim and Krashen, 1997). The most often cited reasons for this reluctance is the observation that reading in English is difficult and dull. EFL students have this impression because their English experiences have been limited to textbooks and difficult passages read in preparation for examinations (H. Kim and Krashen, 1997).

Reading itself appears to be the most powerful motivator for encouraging additional reading; those who participate in sustained silent reading (SSR) programs show clear increases in the amount of free reading they do outside of school (Pilgreen and Krashen, 1993) and the effect appears to last years after the SSR program ends (Greaney and Clarke, 1975). In a series of studies, Cho and Krashen (1994, 1995) documented a strong interest in reading interest and reading frequency, along with obvious growth in English language competence, among adult ESL acquirers who were provided with easy, interesting reading material (The Sweet Valley series). In fact, a single positive experience can have a profound influence on reading attitudes. Ramos and Krashen (1998) reported that a single trip to a local public library with a plentiful supply of children's books and a helpful librarian resulted in a a clear increase in interest in reading a nd books among second graders who previously had had little exposure to quality children's literature. In Von Sprecken, J. Kim and Krashen (1999) and J. Kim and Krashen (2000) a large percentage of elementary school children reported that a single positive experience was critical in stimulating their interest in reading: well over half reported that they had had what Trealease (personal communication) has named "a home run experience" with a book that set them on the path of lifelong reading (1). In our study, we sought to supply a home run experience for elementary school teachers.

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a single, positive experience with easy comprehensible texts with a special group of EFL students: Practicing teachers enrolled in a training course in English language teaching. We felt it was especially crucial to expose these future English teachers to a positive experience with English reading, because of the potential positive influence English reading could have on their students, as well as their own English language development.

Subjects

Eighty-six (86) elementary teachers from approximately 50 different schools in Korea participated in the study. All were enrolled in a short term teacher training program focusing on improving their English and on methodology in English language teaching. Only 36 had had previous experience teaching English, but all had taken English as a foreign language classes, beginning at grade seven and lasting until college. Teachers were divided into five separate classes for the English language training. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sustained Silent Reading Experiences among Korean Teachers of English as a Foreign Language: The Effect of a Single Exposure to Interesting, Comprehensible Reading
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.