Dynastic Politics; from Tipper Gore to Andrew Cuomo

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Dynastic Politics; from Tipper Gore to Andrew Cuomo


Byline: Tod Lindberg, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The news last week that Tipper Gore contemplated a run for the U.S. Senate in Tennessee is yet another illustration of the dynastic character of American politics nowadays. Whether this situation is all that new is an open question. But it does seem safe to say that one of the most common ways people get into politics is by being born into it or marrying into it.

We'll start at the top, with the president who is the son of a president and the brother of the governor of Florida. And, of course ,George H.W. Bush was the son of Sen. Prescott Bush of Connecticut, who served from 1952 to 1963.

The Gore dynasty is just as noteworthy. The former vice president previously served as senator from Tennessee, the position his wife was contemplating a bid for and the position his father held from 1953 to 1971 (following 14 years in the House). And I, for one, won't be surprised if we hear news in the not too distant future about the ambitions of Korenna Gore Schiff, who was a key adviser to her father's presidential campaign.

The Kennedy dynasty is an epic unto itself, and it remains very much a work in progress, especially for the hopes vested in Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, currently lieutenant governor from Maryland but thought to have the potential to run on a national ticket one day.

At the 2000 Democratic convention, two of the showcased speakers were Tennessee Rep. Harold Ford Jr., who in 1996 at the age of 26 succeeded to the House seat his father held for 22 years, and Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., who came to the House in 1995.

From Mario Cuomo to Andrew Cuomo, from Bill Clinton to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, from Bob Dole to would-be North Carolina senator Elizabeth Dole: One could go on for some time climbing the family trees in this old-growth forest.

This phenomenon is worth remarking for a number of reasons. First of all, it demonstrates the power of branding: the easiest way to overcome the biggest barrier to entry to a career in politics, namely, that no one knows who you are, and therefore no one will give you the time of day, let alone a $1,000 campaign contribution.

But a brand name is no guarantee of political success. If George H.W. Bush were Coca-Cola, George W. Bush might have turned out to be Diet Coke (a huge success) or New Coke (a corporate fiasco). There's no guarantee. And anybody who thinks Hillary Rodham Clinton won her Senate race in New York on the strength of her husband is mistaken. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dynastic Politics; from Tipper Gore to Andrew Cuomo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.