Party Unites for Clement; Tennessee Democrat Seeks Thompson Seat

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Party Unites for Clement; Tennessee Democrat Seeks Thompson Seat


Byline: Amy Fagan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Democratic Rep. Bob Clement announced yesterday he will run for the U.S. Senate seat in Tennessee being vacated by Republican Sen. Fred Thompson.

"I have the experience. I have been preparing for this moment. I am ready to be your U.S. senator," Mr. Clement told a gathering of supporters in Nashville.

Attending were Tipper Gore and Democratic Rep. Bart Gordon - both of whom considered running for the seat but instead decided to support Mr. Clement.

"The process Democrats went through ended up with a pretty unified party behind Bob Clement," said a Democratic political analyst in Washington. "He's from the central part of the state, from a large media market. He's well-known ... and he starts with a good and important base - namely, Nashville."

Mrs. Gore, wife of former Vice President Al Gore, briefly considered a run for the seat once held by her husband, but announced Sunday she would not enter the race. "It would be such an honor to work for the people of Tennessee," Mrs. Gore said in a statement. "However, I have decided that it is not right for me, right now, to seek to represent them in the United States Senate."

Mr. Thompson announced March 8 that he will not seek re-election, setting off a flurry of activity in both parties and focusing attention on a race that earlier appeared to be an easy win for Republicans.

Democratic Rep. Harold E. Ford Jr. considered a run for the seat, but issued a statement yesterday saying he strongly endorses Mr. Clement. "He is the choice of the Tennessee Democratic Party and the congressional delegation. I look forward to campaigning with him," Mr. Ford said.

Mr. Gordon and Rep. John Tanner each said last week they would not seek the party's nomination for the seat.

"I think the delegation got together and made a collective decision ... to put the interest of Tennessee first. No one was pushed," said Robert Gibbs, press secretary for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

One Democratic analyst said that Mr. Clement would likely appeal to a broader audience in Tennessee than Mr. Ford would have. He said that Mr. Ford would have been perceived as being more liberal because he is from the Memphis area. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Party Unites for Clement; Tennessee Democrat Seeks Thompson Seat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.