Honduran Tragedy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Honduran Tragedy


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Honduran tragedy

Hurricanes, floods and drought hit Honduras with such a vengeance over the past three years that it cannot afford the return of 105,000 Hondurans facing potential deportation from the United States, Honduran diplomats said yesterday.

"A return would destabilize Honduras socially, politically and economically, Foreign Minister Guillermo Perez told Embassy Row.

Mr. Perez is visiting Washington to appeal to the Bush administration and members of Congress to allow the Hondurans to remain for another 18 months after their special visas expire in July.

After Hurricane Mitch struck in 1998, the United States granted temporary protected status to the Hondurans for 18 months. The status was renewed after Tropical Storm Keith in 2000. Honduras was hit by Hurricane Michelle last year.

The banana and coffee crops, Honduras' two chief exports, have suffered from plunging prices on the international market, Mr. Perez said.

"The exodus of Hondurans to the United States started with Mitch in a massive way, he said. "Since we cannot afford for them to come back, we're seeking a temporary extension and then a permanent solution.

"This can be very beneficial to the United States. Hondurans are very hard-working people. They are low wage, and they are doing jobs necessary for the U.S. economy.

They also send about $600 million a year back to relatives in Honduras.

"Twenty-five percent of the population depends on these remittances, Mr. Perez said.

Mr. Perez has already gotten support from some members of Congress. Sen. Chuck Hagel, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, wrote Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Attorney General John Ashcroft to urge renewal of the designation.

"This is clearly in the interest of the United States, the Nebraska Republican wrote.

In his own letter to Mr. Powell, Mr. Perez said, "As a result of ... ongoing environmental disasters, the severe disruption to living conditions in Honduras continues and temporarily prevents Honduras from adequately handling the return of its nationals.

"The impact of these environmental catastrophies, which in many instances have undone the progress made under the reconstruction program [after Hurricane Mitch], have been compounded by the international economic slowdown and the recession experienced by the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Honduran Tragedy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.