Honoring Our Poets: Petrarch and Balagtas

Manila Bulletin, March 26, 2002 | Go to article overview

Honoring Our Poets: Petrarch and Balagtas


FLORENCE - As Senator Aquilino Pimentel, Jr. and I stood at the great plaza transfixed by the beauty of the Florentine Cathedral, also called the Duomo, I could not help thinking that the high points in human civilizations are first announced by great art. This was the home of the poets Dante and Petrarch and the artists Michaelangelo, Giotto and Leonardo Da Vinci.

We had earlier visited the Accademia Gallery where the original sculpture of King David, in all his naked splendor, presided over the great works of the Florentine masters. There has never been any other like it in the history of art.

Around the tenth century, AD there was a burst of genius in the Tuscany region, centered in the city of Florence, on a scale never paralleled before or since. This is called The Renaissance, the beginning of the modern mind.

The age of science also began here. Galileo followed up on the Copemican Resolution which held that the earth was not flat but round, a humble planet that revolved around the sun and not otherwise. Galileo experimented with the law of gravity by hurling objects from the leaning Tower of Pisa, a port town near Florence.

Petrarch began as a lawyer, but get bored with the law and junked it to become a romantic poet and the restorer of Greek classical humanism. He wrote hundreds of sonnets to his love, a mysterious woman by the name of Laura, but his love was never requited. Petrarch was declared a national poet and was crowned by the Roman Senate.

To this we owe the beginnings of the modern poet laureate and the tradition of naming the national artists.

The English poet Shelly called the poets "the lawgivers of mankind," which is probably true in the Florentine sense. Petrarch was the founder of modern humanism. The poets and the artists, as well as the scientists, were the founding fathers not only of nations and empires but also of entire civilizations.

This may be the starting point of the consideration of how artists and poets fare in our own Philippine society.

They are not heroes and objects of public adulation, - this honor is reserved to movie stars, entertainers and basketball icons - but are castaways faintly remembered on their anniversaries.

We have a National Commission on Culture and the Arts, which spends most of its time and public funds quarrelling over turf and on such inconsiderable minutiae as the correct date when the Revolution erupted - August 23 or August 26 - in Balintawak or Pugad Lawin?

And yet the republic's first founding father undeniably was a poet and an artist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Honoring Our Poets: Petrarch and Balagtas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.