Arab Communique Praises Intifada; Denounces Israel; Arafat, Mubarak Not at Summit

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

Arab Communique Praises Intifada; Denounces Israel; Arafat, Mubarak Not at Summit


Byline: Betsy Pisik, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

BEIRUT - Ministers here for an Arab League summit yesterday completed a draft communique of harsh anti-Israeli rhetoric that belied the conciliatory tone of a Saudi peace plan to be discussed later this week.

The formal statement, to be finalized by presidents and prime ministers from 22 Arab nations tomorrow, reflects generations of pain and hatred rather than the more generous tone of the Saudi land-for-peace initiative.

For example, the communique calls for an "activated Arab vision holding Israel fully responsible for its subversive acts against the Palestinian people" and salutes the "heroic intifada."

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, who was to have been a key participant at the summit, was blocked by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon from attending.

Also, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak - an influential and centrist Arab voice - was staying home for unspecified "domestic commitments."

The absence of both leaders came as a blow to summit efforts to address Israeli-Palestinian fighting.

Mr. Sharon, who had been under U.S. pressure to allow Mr. Arafat to attend, said he might have considered it had the Palestinian leader called on his people, in Arabic, to put down their guns and stop 18 months of fighting.

"Unfortunately, the conditions are not yet ripe for Chairman Arafat's departure for Beirut," Mr. Sharon said in an interview on Israel television's Arab-language program.

After Mr. Sharon's interview, Mr. Arafat's office said Israel was using the summit as leverage to get Palestinians to accept unfair security arrangements for ending their uprising.

"President Arafat has consulted with his leadership and has studied the issue carefully. He has decided not to allow Israel to pressure the Palestinian negotiators into submitting to Israeli conditions, and so he decided not to go to the summit," said Palestinian Information Minister Yasser Abed Rabbo.

The Palestinian leader is expected to address the summit by satellite from Ramallah, where he has been confined by Israel for months.

With Mr. Arafat and Mr. Mubarak absent, the summit appeared yesterday to take on a harsher tone than envisioned a week ago.

The communique promises to raise an additional $150 million to support Palestinian military groups leading the 18-month-old uprising.

"Arab leaders also declared their commitment to cease building any new relations with Israel" until the Jewish state implements international legal resolutions, the communique says.

The 50-page document, written in Arabic, was translated into three pages of English by the National News Agency of Lebanon.

It could be adapted by leaders today and tomorrow to include aspects of the Saudi peace initiative - in which Arab nations would make peace with Israel in exchange for an Israeli withdrawal from land occupied in the 1967 war. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Arab Communique Praises Intifada; Denounces Israel; Arafat, Mubarak Not at Summit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.