Privacy versus Public Interest; COURTS: Legal Battles Provide Ample Evidence That the UK's Become a Nation of Nosy Parkers

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), March 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

Privacy versus Public Interest; COURTS: Legal Battles Provide Ample Evidence That the UK's Become a Nation of Nosy Parkers


Byline: RHODRI OWEN

IT seems there is no getting away from the fact we are a nation of nosy parkers.

The evidence is uncontestable, almost from the moment net curtains were first invented they have been twitching.

And our appetite for knowing the ins and outs of our neighbours lives, not to mention what really goes on behind the closed doors of the rich and famous knows no bounds.

But the issue of whether we have the right to know certain things about certain people has taken on a whole new dimension this week with two extraordinary cases.

At face value Naomi Campbell's drug habit and the extra-marital mischief of Premiership footballer Garry Flitcroft would seem to be of little importance in the greater scheme of things.

But this Easter the court battles surrounding both these cases have been exercising the minds of the country's top legal experts and our highest profile social commentators.

Why? Because a battle is being fought around a fundamental issue of human rights in this country - how can we draw an agreeable line between the public's right to privacy and the public's right to know?

In recent weeks the UK's privacy laws have been tested by these and other celebrities keen to prevent stories being printed in the national newspapers. In each case, national newspapers have been doing their utmost to defend the public's right and desire to know about what has been going on.

Supermodel Campbell, 31, sued The Mirror for breach of confidence and unlawful invasion of privacy after it published a photograph of her leaving a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in London's King's Road in February last year.

Flitcroft has spent seven months and pounds 200,000 fighting a legal battle to prevent a Sunday newspaper exposing his two secret mistresses.

Both would seem to have failed.

Campbell may have won pounds 3,500 damages, but the judge ruled she had only succeeded in establishing breach of confidentiality and breach of the Data Protection Act.

As for the Blackburn midfielder, he was named at last night. In both instances, one might think, we could have happily carried on our lives without gaining intimate knowledge of what each person was getting up to behind closed doors, but this is clearly not the case.

And now one of the highest courts in the land has recognised that while celebrities have the right to some degree of privacy as Mr Justice Morland pointed out, "It does not follow that even with selfpublicists every aspect and detail of their private lives are legitimate quarry for the journalist. They are entitled to some space of privacy."

But on the other hand, it is also arguable that as both Flitcroft and Campbell are highly visible role models for our young sons and daughters, we have a right to know if they are exposed as liars or cheats. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Privacy versus Public Interest; COURTS: Legal Battles Provide Ample Evidence That the UK's Become a Nation of Nosy Parkers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.