Follow Library Maps to Find What You're Looking For

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Follow Library Maps to Find What You're Looking For


Byline: Dan Zack

When you think about it, your public library probably has just about all the information you need for every part of your life. But perhaps the prospect of wading through a building teeming with books and materials is a bit daunting for you. It doesn't have to be, because here at the Gail Borden Public Library we've made finding this information a simple step-by-step process.

Start by taking several steps into the library; turn right at the checkout desk, go through the lobby and straight back to the adult services reference desk. There, nestled within a 10- by 20- foot area, is everything you need to begin. Of course, there are our knowledgeable reference librarians, ready to answer your questions.

In addition, posted on kiosks on the north side of the reference desk area, you'll find several pamphlets and brochures, as well as 18 bibliographies. These lists of books and other resource materials with their authors and call numbers we've subtitled, "Your Map to a World of Resources."

And they are. Let's walk through a typical life with these "maps."

Start by latching on to the brochure, "Simplify Your Life: Use Your Library," and the booklet, "Browsing Guide to the Non-Fiction Collection of the Gail Borden Public Library." That's your base.

Next get the resource map, "Jobs and Careers," filled with occupational guides and tips on resumes and interviewing. Brush up on your computer skills with resources in flyers on computer classes in English and Spanish here at your library. Grab the brochures, "A Quick Guide to the Internet," "Electronic Resources," and "Internet and Dial-In Access to the Gail Borden Public Library."

We've taken care of career and skills, so let's move along to family items. …

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