The Son Also Races: A Candid Dale Earnhardt Jr. on How He's Driving out of His Legendary Dad's Shadow

By McGinn, Daniel; Begun, Bret | Newsweek, April 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Son Also Races: A Candid Dale Earnhardt Jr. on How He's Driving out of His Legendary Dad's Shadow


McGinn, Daniel, Begun, Bret, Newsweek


Byline: Daniel McGinn and Bret Begun

Inside Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s $880,000 custom motor home is a shelf whose contents hint at his complicated role as the race-car-driving son of a martyred NASCAR legend. The cabinet used to be filled with Junior's playthings, and some remain: CDs of obscure rock bands, computer games and copies of Playboy. "That blonde there is hotter-'an-dammit," says the 27-year-old bachelor, ogling a centerfold. "Don't get much better lookin' than that." But since Dale Earnhardt Sr.'s fatal crash at last year's Daytona 500, the Playmates have been joined by keepsakes pushed on Junior by his father's following. He flips through homemade photo collages showing his dad surrounded by fans' cheesy poetry. "A little flea-marketish, you know what I'm saying?" he says. Then he fingers a particularly blurry snapshot. "People do this all the time," he says. "They'll be like 'You gotta have this' "--like it's a long-lost family heirloom, he jokes--"and it's a picture of my dad's backside." Before the crash, Junior had few photos of his father--indeed, their relationship was never picture-perfect. But now, even as he mocks fans who create shrines to Dale Senior, he's loath to throw away the most mediocre shots. "It's good to have some extras," he says.

As this year's racing season hits cruising speed, the cameras are in constant close-up on the young man driving the No. 8 Budweiser Chevy. Like JFK Jr. or Prince William, this son of an icon has become an object of fascination himself. And after a slow start in his third full season on NASCAR's Winston Cup circuit, in recent weeks Junior has been driving near the front of the pack. In 2001 he finished eighth in the points total, and won three races and $5.8 million in prize money; as of last week he was ranked sixth. "I'm pretty pumped to be where we are," Junior tells NEWSWEEK. But his celebrity has eclipsed those numbers. Judging from the applause, he's the crowd's favorite. He starred in ads that aired during the Super Bowl and the Olympics; his recent book, "Driver No. 8," hit No. 4 on The New York Times bestseller list. Junior inherited many of his fans from his father, but he's attracted new ones, too, with huge crossover appeal to the MTV crowd. That attention comes at a price. Richard Petty worries about Junior's ability to focus on driving amid growing celebrity distractions. But he sees no shortage of talent. "He can be as good as his dad," he says.

If Earnhardt Sr. was proud of his son's following him into the driver's seat, the dad rarely showed it. Junior's parents divorced when he was 3. Dale Senior remarried and started a new family; because of his travel schedule, he had limited time for his son. Even when Junior started racing at 16, his father never came to his races and provided little encouragement. In 1999, the Earnhardts raced against each other for the first time. Junior was ecstatic. "I didn't give a f--- about the race--I just wanted to be out there on the same straightaway, to watch him right in front of me," he says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Son Also Races: A Candid Dale Earnhardt Jr. on How He's Driving out of His Legendary Dad's Shadow
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.