Uzbeks Need Help, Not Lectures. (Fair Comment)

By Joyal, Paul M. | Insight on the News, April 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Uzbeks Need Help, Not Lectures. (Fair Comment)


Joyal, Paul M., Insight on the News


Uzbekistan has emerged on the world scene as the chief ally of the United States in Central Asia and a key player in the war against al-Qaeda. This fact was showcased by the cooperation pact signed by Uzbek President Islam Karimov and U.S. President George W. Bush in the White House. The declaration on strategic partnership and cooperation established rive separate categories of practical goals that moue beyond the sphere of military security and into that of creating an open democratic system of a market-based economy. The declaration is the culmination of a relationship that has suffered from the extremes of U.S. State Department indifference and finger-pointing lectures by human-rights mavens.

In recent weeks the hand-wringing has received plenty of space in the mainstream press, and journalists were in an accusatory mood at the Blair House on March 13 as they pelted Karimov with questions about his plan for improving human rights. Karimov responded with a list of his previous steps for establishing relations with the International Red Cross and Amnesty International, and described the continuing threat from the Jordanian-founded Hizb at-Tahrir-Islami or Islamic Liberation Party. This secretive group seeks to establish a fundamentalist Islamic state throughout Central Asia and the Middle East.

Sodyq Safaev, first deputy foreign minister and former Uzbek ambassador to the United States, concedes that problems exist concerning human rights, but "we need practical help, not just lectures," he says.

One example where the United States can offer concrete assistance is in the area of drug enforcement. A narcotics connection to the radical Islamic threat has been documented, and it is one of the top problems Uzbekistan faces. According to Safaev, a kilo (2.2 pounds) of heroin that sells for $1,000 in Kabul will fetch $10,000 in Tashkent, $100,000 in Moscow and the enormous price of $240,000 in London. It is not only a means of making money for underground terrorist organizations but "part of the radical Islamic terrorist strategy of narcotic aggression. The goal is to create as much disorder as possible," he says. The purpose is to weaken states and encourage corruption, especially in Western countries, according to Safaev.

The United States clearly is in a position to practically assist Uzbekistan in combating narcotics. This is especially important with Uzbekistan's young population. Today, 70 percent of Uzbeks are younger than 30 and, of that number, 50 percent are younger than 18. These numbers require Uzbekistan to open itself up to the world and become a more democratic country with a market-driven economy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Uzbeks Need Help, Not Lectures. (Fair Comment)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.