Walkers Raise Money to Benefit Research of Multiple Sclerosis

By Waldron, Patrick | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Walkers Raise Money to Benefit Research of Multiple Sclerosis


Waldron, Patrick, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Patrick Waldron Daily Herald Staff Writer

Gene Keck used a red marker to write his wife's name, with hearts on either side of it, on the yellow entry card he pinned to his shirt Sunday for the Fox Valley Multiple Sclerosis Walk.

His wife, Donna, 44, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a chronic and often disabling disease of the central nervous system, in 1987. This year her symptoms have made it difficult for her to walk and she was unable to join Gene and their daughter Kris on the six-mile hike along the Fox River in St. Charles and Geneva.

But with physical therapy and continuing treatment, Gene Keck said his wife is improving.

"She'll pull out of it," he said.

The Fox Valley walk was one of 22 separate events held around Illinois Sunday put on by the Greater Illinois Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to raise money for multiple sclerosis research. The Fox Valley group didn't have specific numbers of participants Sunday, but 590 people pre-registered and a total of 857 walkers were expected.

Marcia Clark, of Elburn, couldn't join her granddaughter for the walk in Bloomington, Ill., but she did make it to the St. Charles event. Clark's granddaughter, Randy Russ, was diagnosed with the disease at age 16. …

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Walkers Raise Money to Benefit Research of Multiple Sclerosis
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