Obituaries

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), April 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

Obituaries


Byline: The Register-Guard

Marguerite Severy

FLORENCE - The funeral will be held today, April 11, for Marguerite C. "Marge" Severy of Florence, who died April 6 of age-related causes. She was 94.

Severy was born July 28, 1907, in Sutton Creek to Frank and Lucy Drew. Her husband, Carl Severy, died in August 1972.

She was born and reared in the Florence area near the North Fork of the Siuslaw River. She attended Chemawa Indian School near Salem in the 1920s.

Severy had many jobs, including mill worker, grass planter and mushroom picker. She was an elder of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians and one of the oldest tribe members.

Severy enjoyed being with her Indian people and caring for animals and other living things. She was a member of the North Fork Grange and the Evangelical Church in Florence.

Today's service will be at 1 p.m. at the Evangelical Church in Florence. Burial will be held today at the Indian burial grounds at the North Fork of the Siuslaw River. Burns' Riverside Chapel/Florence Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Mabel Kingery

YONCALLA - Mabel Kingery of Yoncalla died April 7 of pulmonary fibrosis. She was 82.

Kingery was born July 14, 1919, in Eugene to Dare and Anna Huntington Kingery. After graduating from Yoncalla High School in 1937, she attended Linfield College for two years. She then entered St. Vincent School of Nursing in Portland.

A registered nurse, Kingery worked for more than 24 years for Dr. Thomas Montgomery. She also worked for more than 17 years in the intensive care unit of the Veterans' Hospital in Portland as nursing director and patient advocate.

In 1991, Kingery returned to the family farm in Yoncalla, where she experimented with hydroponic gardening and planted fruit trees and berries.

She enjoyed family celebrations, cats and horses, knitting, classical music and birdwatching. She also was a Portland Trail Blazer fan and kept up with the latest medical information.

Kingery was proud of her pioneer heritage. She wrote the Cowan-Kingery chapter of the "Yoncalla Yesterday" history book.

Survivors include a brother, Donald of Yoncalla; and three sisters, Mary Bohlander of Mobridge, S.D., Molly Anderson of Glenham, S.D., and Doris Means of Yoncalla.

No service is planned. Burial will be at the family cemetery on the Kingery Ranch in Yoncalla. Smith-Lund-Mills Funeral Chapel in Cottage Grove is in charge of arrangements.

Roy Peterson

REEDSPORT - The graveside service will be held April 13 for Roy N. Peterson of Reedsport, who died April 5 of age-related causes. He was 87.

Peterson was born April 15, 1914, in Tacoma to John and Hannah Lundgren Peterson.

After moving from Tacoma to Reedsport as a child, he attended Reedsport High School.

He worked as a logger for E.K. Woods Lumber Co. and International Paper Co.

He enjoyed fishing, crabbing and clam digging.

Survivors include two daughters, Janet Conger of Portland and Joanne Adams of Vancouver, Wash.; and three grandchildren. His two wives, Toots Peterson and Evelyn Peterson, died previously.

Visitation will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Dunes Memorial Chapel in Reedsport. Saturday's service will be at 2 p.m. at the cemetery. Dunes Memorial Chapel in Reedsport is in charge of arrangements.

Frank Field

Frank James Field of Eugene died April 1 of heart disease. He was 80.

Field was born July 20, 1921, in Boise to Frank and Dorthy Mawson Field. He married Veronica Hopton in Newcastle, Australia, in Sept. 27, 1944.

He graduated from military school and served in the Navy medical corps. Field later worked as a ceramic tile contractor.

He enjoyed golfing, fishing, track and basketball. He especially enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren. …

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