Vacant Properties Network Holds Policy Forum on New Case Studies

By Schilling, Joseph | Public Management, April 2002 | Go to article overview

Vacant Properties Network Holds Policy Forum on New Case Studies


Schilling, Joseph, Public Management


Virtually every city and town has a derelict apartment building, boarded storefront, or vacant lot. Vacant properties contain an array of conditions (illegally dumped refuse, leaking sewage, and fire hazards) that pose a serious threat to public health and safety. They also strain municipal budgets and the resources of local police, fire, building, and health departments. To abate and rehabilitate these neighborhood eyesores, a number of cities have created innovative programs. A few cities have gone further by making vacant property revitalization an integral part of their infill development and affordable housing strategies tinder the Smart Growth rubric.

These were just a few of the issues raised at a brown-bag policy forum hosted by ICMA's Vacant Properties Network in January. Over 25 government officials (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the state of Maryland, and the cities of Baltimore, Richmond, and the District of Columbia) and representatives from housing and community development organizations (LISC, Fannie Mae Foundation, Environmental Law Institute) shared their national and local experiences with the revitalization of vacant properties and provided feedback on the Network's research efforts.

The discussion focused on the cross-cutting results from three case studies recently completed by ICMA's Smart Growth Study Team: Portland, Oregon, Richmond, Virginia, and San Diego, California. The ICMA team spent 18 months working closely with city staff and other stakeholders to identify the practical lessons learned from these three programs. One of the goals was to find ways that cities can include vacant properties as part of their broader initiatives to promote smart growth. ICMA wanted to help local officials understand the stages of vacant property revitalization and the critical need for holistic programs and policies,--and the right personnel and resources to implement them.

Here are a few highlights from the case studies:

* Portland: The city overcame a vacant property crisis (more than 2,900 properties in 1988) by formally linking vacant property revitalization with its regional planning and affordable housing strategies. Portland also formed critical partnerships with local community development corporations (CDCs). As a result, the Portland Development Commission transferred vacant properties to local CDCs for affordable housing projects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Vacant Properties Network Holds Policy Forum on New Case Studies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.