He says/She Says

By Reese, Joel; Vitello, Barbara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

He says/She Says


Reese, Joel, Vitello, Barbara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Joel Reese & Barbara Vitello

Should public displays of affection be a bit more private?

HE SAYS: If I wanted to ogle public romance, I'd head to a seedy video store.

Hold the hugs, please:

Spring is finally in the air, and that means baseball, open sunroofs, and - sadly - public displays of affection.

It's inevitable: The temperature gets warmer, and couples suddenly decide all the world is their stage for brazen make-out sessions.

Mind you, I'm not talking the harmless hand-in-hand stuff here. I'm talking about the breathy, open-mouth, smoochy-woochy displays of passion - the kind of thing Angelina Jolie and Billy Bob Thornton seem to adore so dearly.

Just call me the grouch:

I say keep it behind closed doors - but I know I'm in the minority here.

A recent Harlequin survey says 62 percent say they have no objection to such unashamed affection, while only 16 percent think mushy couples should "get a room."

I know you're going to say I'm a cantankerous curmudgeon, Barbara, but I side with that 16 percent.

Look, I'm aware that couples feel affectionate toward each other, and they want to express it.

But there's nothing more awkward than, say, sitting on the train behind a couple playing tongue tag. It's like they're saying, "Hey, look at us. We're in love, and we're going to show everyone."

Well, imagine you just got out of a painful breakup, and you can't help but be confronted by this tender twosome. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

He says/She Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.