Grassroots Crusader

By Brown, Donna | Management Review, June 1990 | Go to article overview

Grassroots Crusader


Brown, Donna, Management Review


What happens in a small town when a whistle-blower takes the community's largest employers? The story of St. Gabriel, La., population 2,100, is a case in point.

In 1986, pharmacist Kay Gaudet noticed an alarming trend: St. Gabriel women had an unusually high rate of miscarriage. Gaudet started to track the miscarriages. To date she has recorded over 80 of them-a figure well above the national average.

In addition, local cancer rates are so high that the stretch of land where St. Gabriel is located, between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, has been nicknamed "Cancer Alley."

Locals had long blamed the high cancer rate on nearby chemical plants. St. Gabriel's home parish of East Iberville has 15 plants in operation-some only a few miles from the town line. Convinced that the mysterious miscarriages were also being caused by plant emissions, Gaudet set her sights on the chemical industry. She lobbied for an investigation by Louisiana authorities, but to no avail. Finally, her quest for the truth cumulated with a Sierra Club press conference in Washington, D.C.

This maneuver got Gaudet the attention she had been seeking: Before long, Louisiana's Department of Health and Hospitals commissioned a Tulane University study to examine the causes of miscarriages in East Iberville parish. But study results showed no clear connection between the miscarriages and the chemical plants. In addition, the Louisiana Chemical Association commissioned Dr. Otto Wong, an epidemiologist who is also the executive vice president of ENSR Health Sciences in Alameda, Calif., to examine the area's abnormally high rates of cancer. Again, initial results suggested that the chemical plants have not contributed to the area's cancer rates.

Is this a case of misplaced finger pointing? Or could the studies be wrong? Gaudet remains convinced that the industry is at fault-and she offers some compelling criticism of the Tulane miscarriage study. "I don't think they [the Tulane researchers] reached the black community here adequately," she says. According to their study, the rate for stillbirths [among black infants] is three times that of whites. And yet they claim that the rates for miscarriages among blacks in this area is lower than the rate for whites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Grassroots Crusader
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.