Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy

American Journalism Review, April 2002 | Go to article overview

Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy


JOHN F. KENNEDY SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT HARVARD UNIVERSITY

ANNOUNCES THE WINNER OF THE 2002 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting

Duff Wilson and David Heath

The Seattle Times

"Uninformed Consent: What patients at 'The Hutch' weren't told about the experiments in which they died." Patients at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center had been deprived of essential information about the risks of clinical trials in which they were enrolled.

FINALISTS

Knight Ridder

"A Taste of Slavery" Sumana Chatterjee and Sudarsan Raghavan Reporters found boys enslaved on remote Ivory Coast farms, harvesting cocoa, and concluded that slavery tainted nearly every chocolate product.

The Los Angeles Times

"Revealing Terrorism" Bob Drogin, Josh Meyer, Craig Pyes, William C. Rempel and Sebastian Rotella

A team of reporters covered the trial of Ahmed Ressam, and followed their leads to the little-known international terrorist network to which Ressam belonged, its links to Osama bin Laden, and the high level of terrorist threat facing the United States.

The Los Angeles Times

"The New FDA: Partnership With Deadly Risk" David Willman An investigative reporter saved many lives by exposing the deadly risks of prescription drugs approved by the FDA under a new marketfriendly mandate. …

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